General election 2017- Scotland

Lois-Drake-2-cropped

Lois Drake, Policy and Campaigns Officer, National Deaf Children’s Society

On 18 April 2017, the Prime Minister, Theresa May announced a snap election would take place on 8 June 2017. What will your new MPs in Scotland do to ensure deaf children and young people and their families in your area get the support they need?

There has been positive progress lately in Scotland for deaf young people and their families. The British Sign Language (Scotland) Act 2015 (BSL Act) was passed which marked an historic moment for deaf people across the country.

The implementation of the new laws is now underway with the draft BSL National Plan open for consultation. However work must continue by closing any existing gaps in support that exist for all deaf children and young people and their families.

Some key facts prospective MPs in Scotland should be aware of:-

  • We estimate there are as many as 3850 deaf children in Scotland today and we believe that, with the right support, they can do anything other children can do;
  • Deafness is not a learning disability, but deaf learners consistently do worse than their hearing peers at school;
  • Teachers of the Deaf are vital for many deaf children but there is regional variation in staffing levels and services are being squeezed with half are due to retire within the next 10 to 15 years;
  • The latest Scottish Government data shows that last year 11.8% of deaf learners left school with no qualifications (compared with 2.6% of all pupils) and 38.7% obtained Highers or Advanced Highers (compared with 59.3% of all pupils). This gap in achievement at school goes on to affect deaf young people’s life chances, with 24.7% going onto university compared with 41.3% of those with no additional support needs;
  • The British Sign Language (Scotland) Act 2015, Getting It Right for Every Child (GIRFEC) and a strong focus on educational attainment all have the potential to drive positive outcomes for deaf children and their families;
  • While this progress should be celebrated, there is still much work to be done to ensure that every deaf child in Scotland gets the support they need from birth – with standards of support variable across Scotland, we need MPs who will champion deaf children in their area!
  • The early years are a critical time for deaf children to develop the language and communication skills they need for life, as outlined in our recent report Getting It Right From the Start;

Will your MP be an advocate for deaf children in your area?

Tell them to email us at campaigns.scotland@ndcs.org.uk to request a briefing.

Could you help a family struggling with their child’s deafness?

Joanne O'Donnell

Joanne O’Donnell, Everyone Together Project Officer (Parenting)

The Everyone Together project will be recruiting parent/carer volunteers to support our work. Could you spare some time to volunteer with us? Project Officer Joanne O’Donnell explains more:

“The Everyone Together project supports families with a deaf child aged 0-8 years in Scotland. We are committed to building support around deaf children, beginning with the family, and bringing in professionals and the wider community.

If you remember back to when your child was diagnosed, chances are you remember that feeling of being alone. By recruiting parent volunteers, we hope that Everyone Together will provide families with emotional support from someone who has been in their position. There is nothing more encouraging than knowing someone has been through a similar situation and reached the other side.”

Interested? Read on to find out more.

What will I be asked to do?

We have a number of volunteer opportunities and we would work with you to identify the best role for you. Tasks undertaken by volunteers include:

  • Talking to parents with a newly identified deaf child. Sharing your experiences and explaining about the support we can offer;
  • Giving talks to parents and professionals at workshops, courses and conferences;
  • Speaking to the media about your family, our charity and our services;
  • Supporting a parent/carer to attend one of our events by accompanying them or meeting them at the event.

How much time will I be asked to commit?

It’s up to you – let us know what you can commit to, and we will let you know which opportunities might best suit your availability.

What support will I receive?

You will receive training and ongoing support in your role. Your achievements and contribution will be celebrated through an annual recognition event and we will reimburse all out of pocket expenses incurred through your volunteer role.

I would like to volunteer

Great! The first step is to let us know you are interested. You can do this by emailing everyone.together@ndcs.org.uk or by contacting Joanne on 0141 880 7044/ 07837 056 267. We will provide you with more information and an application form.

If you live elsewhere in the UK and would like to know about other volunteering opportunities at National Deaf Children’s Society, please email volunteer@ndcs.org.uk or call 0121 234 9829. Alternatively, you can find current volunteering opportunities on our website.

Make 2017 the year you become an NDCS volunteer.

A Day in the Life of a Parenting Facilitator

 

Anne Frances Mason

Anne-Frances Mason, Raising a Deaf Child Facilitator

Think parenting courses are all naughty steps and no fun? Think again, as Anne-Frances, one of our fabulous facilitators explains…

Many of you will have heard of ‘Raising a Deaf Child’, the parenting course designed and endorsed by National Deaf Children’s Society. For those of you who haven’t, allow me to provide you with a sneaky snapshot of the course.

My background in social work means I have experience of delivering a range of parenting classes over the years. But sorry, I have come to the conclusion that this practice of running participants through programmes from A-Z often leaves people with more questions than answers.

My current role as a Raising a Deaf Child facilitator could not be more different and here’s why:

The shape changes. The sessions might be in workshop form, a one-off weekend, regular blocks of short, sharp sessions or a taster slotted into a special event.

The sequence changes. We might begin at the end and skip backwards. Why? Because parents prioritise the topics and ‘Everyone Together’ listens.

At the heart of my job as facilitator is my duty and privilege to remind every parent and carer of a deaf child that they are the expert when it comes to their child. Parents sometimes forget this. But please don’t forget that we are all different and it is vital that we celebrate the world of differences for each deaf child.

Finally, it is only fair to make mention of the secret ingredients that have made the Raising a Deaf Child a success. Apart from the food, the fun, the ice-breakers and the guest speakers, there is that parent sitting opposite who has experienced almost exactly the same as the parent who is climbing the walls. They’ve been there, they know, and their insight is passed on. Peer power in action.

But don’t just take it from me, come and see for yourself!

The ‘Everyone Together’ project is funded by Big Lottery Fund, and supports families with a deaf child aged 0-8 years in Scotland. To find out more about our 2017 workshops, visit the Everyone Together events page.

Lottery Injection For Scotland’s Deaf Children and Young People

Lois Drake, Policy and Campaigns Officer, National Deaf Children's Society

Lois Drake, Policy and Campaigns Officer, National Deaf Children’s Society

Hundreds of deaf children and young people across Scotland will be able to play a fuller role within their families and communities, thanks to a huge £445,202 cash injection of Lottery funding.

The Big Lottery Fund have announced 60 new grants across Scotland totalling £17 million.

The National Deaf Children’s Society will use its £445,202 award for its Scotland wide ‘Everyone Together for Deaf Children’ project, which will offer advice and training to professionals working in the field and will develop the skills and confidence of over 350 children up to the age of eight, and their families.

The project will help to support children like 2 year old Halle Rawlinson from Falkirk who has cochlear implants and uses both sign and speech. Halle’s Mum, Alyson, attended a Family Sign Language (FSL) course through the National Deaf Children’s Society in 2014.

Alyson said:  “Halle was born profoundly deaf, with no immediate prospect of being eligible for implants. So when she was really little we felt a bit at a loss as to what to do to communicate with her and stimulate her development longer term. We had bought some baby sign books which were useful, but limiting as there were often just signs for specific words and objects. We looked into signing courses but there seemed aimed at people wanting to talk to deaf adults or people to become interpreters. Nothing was aimed at hearing parents of under-fives to help us understand how best to communicate with our daughter. It felt as though I was not expected to have to make any adjustments for her deafness.”

Heather Gray, National Deaf Children’s Society Director (Scotland and Northern Ireland) said: “This innovative new project will mark a step change in the early years support available for deaf children and their families in Scotland. The funding will allow us to use an early intervention approach to address the unique barriers deafness can create at a vital point in a child’s life.

“By supporting deaf children, empowering their families and training the professionals that work with them, it will help give deaf children the best start in life. Following the historic passage of the British Sign Language (Scotland) Act (2015), the launch of this project is another fantastic example of how Scotland is leading the way in taking steps to empower the deaf community and help deaf children and young people access their rights.”

Scottish Election 2016: Employment and welfare

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Katie Rafferty, Policy & Campaigns Manager, Scotland , National Deaf Children’s Society

The future of jobs and welfare in Scotland has taken centre stage in many of the debates ahead of tomorrow’s Scottish Parliament election. How does each of the main parties plan to improve the experience of deaf young people in these two vital areas?

The Scottish Conservative party

  • Commit to halving the disability employment gap and say that the welfare system should support the most vulnerable.
  • They also say we should consider whether Disability Living Allowance and Personal Independence Payments should be managed more locally.

The Scottish Green party

  • Recognise that too many people are marginalised in the labour market, including disabled. They also support the devolution and expansion of the Access to Work scheme.
  • They recognise the move from DLA to PIP has disadvantaged thousands of disabled people and they will push for all PIP claims to be granted initially to avoid delays in accessing support.
  • Further information is available on how they believe Scotland can ensure equal opportunities for disabled people.

The Scottish Labour party

  • Commit to supporting those furthest from the labour market, such as disabled people, to get work through being provided with the specialist support they need.
  • They support the Scottish Government’s commitment to delivering 30,000 apprenticeships and increasing the number of disabled trainees. In addition, they commit to every part of government offering internships, with places guaranteed for those who are disabled.
  • They also want to create a new agency, Skills Scotland, to deliver inclusive skills training.
  • More information is available in their Disability Manifesto 2016.

The Scottish Liberal Democrats

  • Commit to increasing the number of those with disabilities in Modern Apprenticeships.
  • They make no specific commitments with regards to DLA/PIP but more generally to a fairer welfare system.

The Scottish National Party

  • Commits to maintaining the level of disability benefits and making assessment processes fairer.
  • They have pledged to deliver 30 000 apprenticeships, and ensure these are open to all by increasing uptake by disabled people.
  • They believe the DWP’s Work Programme has failed unemployed and disabled people and commit to investing a further £20 million a year into services for those with significant barriers to the labour market.
  • More information is available on what they’ll do for disabled people.

So far over 2700 emails have been sent to local candidates reminding them about the needs of deaf children. Take action today by contacting your future MSPs and help us reach every candidate in Scotland.

Email your candidates

Scottish Election 2016: what do the main parties offer deaf children and their families?

Katie-Rafferty-cropped

Katie Rafferty, Policy & Campaigns Manager, Scotland , National Deaf Children’s Society

With less than a week to go until voting takes place on 5 May, we read the five main political parties’ manifestos, and looked at what they offer in relation to education support. What promises will impact on deaf children and their families? Here we provide a brief education round-up.

How will each party ensure every child gets the support they need to reach their full potential at school?

Most of the parties have a strong focus on closing the education attainment gap in the next term of Scottish Parliament. Below we have set out how each party plans to improve education.

Scottish Conservatives Party

  • Commit to additional funding to follow individual pupils with Additional Support Needs (ASN).
  • They also commit to reversing the Named Person legislation and instead setting up a Crisis Family Fund to support vulnerable children.

Scottish Green Party

  • Commit to reducing class sizes as well as protecting ASN teacher posts in recognition of their role in closing the attainment gap for children from different backgrounds.
  • They are against further testing with a focus instead on teacher/pupil ratios.

Scottish Labour Party

  • Will establish a Fair Start Fund, funded through the re-introduction of the 50p tax rate for those earning over £150,000.
  • This fund will go towards closing the attainment gap as well as generally making sure vulnerable children get the support they need.

Scottish Liberal Democrats

  • Will introduce a 1p increase in income tax to reverse cuts in education and provide greater support.
  • They also propose the introduction of a pupil premium which would attach funding to individual pupils.

Scottish National Party

  • Commit to maintaining teacher numbers and allocating funds directly to Head teachers to allow them to invest resources in ways they consider will have the biggest impact on attainment.
  • They will implement the new National Improvement Framework which they hope will drive up standards for all and help close the attainment gap for pupils from the most and least affluent backgrounds.
  • The SNP is the only party to include a specific commitment to delivering Family Sign Language courses, to help hearing parents communicate with their deaf child.

So far over 2500 emails have been sent to local candidates reminding them about the needs of deaf children. Take action today by contacting your future MSPs and help us reach every candidate in Scotland.

Email your candidates

 

Scottish Parliament Election 2016

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Katie Rafferty, Policy and Campaigns Manager, Scotland

With the right support deaf children have the same chance to succeed as their hearing peers. Yet too many deaf children still face barriers that prevent them from reaching their full potential.

The Scottish Parliament election on Thursday 5 May 2016 is an opportunity to tell your candidates how they can help address these barriers in the future.

Make change happen today by asking your future MSPs to protect and strengthen services for deaf children, and tell them about the amazing things deaf children can do when they get the right support.

Email your candidates

There are other ways you can support our election campaign:

  1. Make some noise! Help us spread the word by telling others to email their candidates too. Why not post about the campaign on Facebook or Twitter using the share buttons? #VoteForDeafChildren
  1. Ask your candidates directly what they will do to support deaf children! Pop along to any election hustings near you and hand over our election briefing.  NDCS are also hosting a hustings for deaf young people on 23 April in Glasgow – do you know any young people who’d like to come?
  1. Don’t forget to vote! The big day is Thursday 5 May 2016.

Keep an eye out for some more blogs coming your way soon about the 2016 Scottish Parliament Election.

Email your candidates