Crossing the Divide

Martin-Mclean-cropped

Martin McLean, Education and Training Policy Advisor (Post-14), National Deaf Children’s Society

Further education (FE) is getting a lot of attention at the moment and rightly so. The UK has major skills shortages in many sectors and Brexit may mean we are less likely to be able to rely on EU immigration to plug the skills gap. The Education Secretary, Justine Greening, as I type this blog, has just made a speech where she talked about creating ‘an army of skilled young people for British business’. To address skills shortages the Government is creating 15 technical routes and new T-level qualifications in England. Wales is also on the verge of significant post-16 education reform.

FE colleges will play a major role in delivering the new qualifications and with FE colleges being the destination for the majority of deaf young people at 16, investment in the new technical routes will be no bad thing if they lead to clearer pathways to employment.

Recently, a small piece of research was carried out for us by a group of civil servants and corporate sector employees on the transition deaf young people make from FE into employment and the support they receive to do this in FE. We asked them to look at this issue because there is so little data out there on the outcomes of deaf young people who attend FE colleges – are they finding jobs after leaving college and how well prepared are they for entering the job market? We suspected that the support available to them to find work might be quite poor. Sadly, the research confirmed that this is probably the case. The main findings of the group’s research were:

  • 59% of parents of deaf young people stated their child’s college did not help them find any work experience or placement opportunities
  • 39% of parents stated their child had not received any careers support or guidance at college
  • Young people who had received college-supported work experience were more likely to have gone onto employment or further study

Some parents reported negative experiences with their child making the transition to work:

“It was disappointing that on his first visit to the Job Centre, in an effort to find employment, they put him on ESA (Employment Support Allowance) without the necessity to attend support sessions. In other words, he was written off as being unemployable”

“We didn’t know what help was available. Recruitment companies didn’t seem to be interested in helping my daughter get a job and I put this down to her being deaf.”

This type of experiences provide a strong case for deaf young people having access to tailored careers advice at school and college. It is not just about access to careers advice that their hearing course-mates receive. Do young people know that they can benefit from Access to Work? Do they understand their rights under the Equality Act? Are they aware of the organisations that might be able to provide further support when they leave education? We believe schools and colleges have a role in making sure deaf young people receive this type of information.

deaf young person looking for work

It is expected that work experience will be a compulsory part of a T-level – this is welcome and we need to make sure deaf young people receive the support they need on these placements.

FE and skills reform has cross-party support and I believe that better investment in FE will benefit many deaf young people. However, before they embark on any technical routes, we need to fight for deaf young people to have better access to decent careers advice so that they can make properly informed decisions about the career opportunities available to them and understand support that is available in the workplace.

I’m deaf myself and remember leaving education to find work being very daunting. I am sure it is the same many deaf young people finishing education today. Through working together with the FE and skills sector NDCS hopes to make the divide between education and work a lot narrower.

Residential special schools and colleges – have your say

 

Emily-Meacher-cropped

Emily Meacher, Campaigns Assistant, National Deaf Children’s Society

Are you a parent of a child in a residential special school or college – or a young person studying in one? If so, a new review has been set up and they want to hear from you. 

What’s this review about?

The Government has asked Dame Christine Lenehan to carry out a review on the experiences and outcomes of children and young people attending residential special schools and colleges. These are sometimes known as boarding schools. The review will help Dame Lenehan come up recommendations for how things might be improved.

Dame Lenehan is keen to hear from as many parents and young people as possible.

How can I take part in the call for evidence?

If you are a parent of a child or young person, the review team are particularly interested in your answers to the following questions:

  • How did you find the process of getting a residential place for your child?
  • Are you happy with where your child is residing?
  • Are you supported in keeping in touch with your child when he/she is away?
  • What outcomes would you like to see from your child attending boarding school/college?

Parents could go through these questions above with their child and discuss together their experiences. Alternatively, there are also some questions for children and young people.

  • What were/are the best things about being at boarding school/college?
  • What were/are the best things about being at boarding school/college?
  • What are the staff who look after you like?
  • What would you like to do after leaving boarding school/college?

How to respond

Each submission to this call for evidence should:

  • be no longer than 2,000 words in length
  • include a brief introduction about yourself/your child and your reason for submitting evidence
  • emailed to Leneham.Review@education.gov.uk before the 17th March.

You can send through responses in alternative formats such as audio or videos.

For more information on the call to evidence, visit the Government’s website.

 

FE is under review

Martin McLean, Education and Training Policy Advisor (post-14)

Martin McLean, Education and Training Policy Advisor (post-14)

The further education (FE) sector often complains about being overlooked with education in schools and universities getting far more attention. However, for deaf young people it matters. Around two thirds of them attend FE colleges in comparison with around one third of hearing young people aged 16. FE provides deaf young people with the opportunity to obtain vocational qualifications and personal maturity.

The sector is in trouble with many FE colleges complaining of a funding crisis following large government cuts to the adult education budget and funding changes for students aged 16-19. The Government has set up a number of area reviews in England to look at FE and 6th form college provision with the aim of ‘restructuring’ the further education sector. They are likely to lead to college mergers in order to bring about greater efficiency. Currently being reviewed are the following areas – Birmingham and Solihull, Sheffield City, Greater Manchester, Tees Valley, Solent Valley, Sussex Coast and West Yorkshire.

Are the reviews relevant to deaf students? They could be. Provision for students with disabilities should be considered under each review. We know that there is a great variation in the amount of specialist support available for deaf students between different colleges. If a college with good support for deaf students is taken over by another college then that support could be at risk. On the other hand, the reviews could be an opportunity to achieve more consistent provision within an area – fewer colleges could mean less variation in the support that is available.

NDCS would like the review steering groups to consider the role of regional provision. This is when a service is used by more than one college rather than each college having its own separate service for deaf students. This could be a more efficient system and ensure that specialist knowledge is available to more students.

NDCS will be sending information to each of the review steering groups. Let’s hope their members take notice and that the reviews can be an opportunity rather than a threat.

5 things to watch out from the new Government

NDCS - Ian Noon, Head of Policy and Research

Ian Noon, Head of Policy and Research

So we have a majority Conservative government! Now the dust has settled on last week’s election results, we’ve looked into our crystal balls and picked out five things to watch out for from our new Government.

1) Education spending. In their manifesto, the Conservatives said they will protect funding for schools on a per pupil basis. This means that, if the number of pupils go up, schools shouldn’t lose out. But it also means that schools might get less money in real terms if inflation goes up. It also means that funding for early years education and post-16 is not protected. So what impact will this have on spending for specialist education services for deaf children? We know from the NDCS Stolen Futures campaign that local authorities have still been cutting services, despite the protection already in place over the past five years. Will that change?

2) Will Ofsted inspections make a difference? We know that Ofsted are planning to inspect local provision for children with special educational needs and that a consultation on how they will do that is due out later this year. What’s not yet certain is the extent to which Ofsted will take a proper, more focused look on how deaf children are doing as part of this. Will Ofsted, for example, inspect specialist education services for deaf children? Indications are that Ofsted are not keen to go into this level of detail. We may need to campaign to make sure they do. We may also need to campaign to make sure that inspections are carried out by inspectors with proper expertise in deafness.

3) Is Disability Living Allowance (DLA) for deaf children under threat? The Conservatives have indicated in the past they would like to look at reforms to DLA for disabled children, having already changed DLA for adults to a new benefit called Personal Independence Payments (PIP). The Conservatives have already pledged to reduce the welfare budget by £12bn, without specifying how they will do that.

4) Audiology services. How can we make sure that audiology services are delivering a good service? Our Listen Up! campaign has found that too many aren’t. Over the past 5 years, it was the government’s policy that audiology services should be accredited under a programme called IQIPs. Yet, to our knowledge, very few have to date. What will happen to those audiology services that don’t get accredited or don’t seek accreditation anytime soon? Will the new Government insist they be closed down or will they just allow poor audiology services to coast along? Will they improve transparency over which audiology services are seeking accreditation?

5) How will the Government halve the disability employment gap? This was one of their manifesto pledges. NDCS believes that many deaf young people will need support from Access to Work to make a successful transition into employment. However, we know that the Government are looking at ways to manage the Access to Work budget, with a new cap to be introduced later this year. Will this make it harder for the Government to support disabled people into employment?

Is there anything else we should be watching out for? Leave a comment below to let us know what you think.

The NDCS policy and campaigns team will be working to get answers to these questions. You can help us campaign for a world without barriers for every deaf child by joining our cool club, the NDCS campaigns network today.

The impact of mild and moderate deafness in the classroom

Vicki Kirwin, Audiology Specialist, NDCS

Vicki Kirwin, Audiology Specialist, NDCS

New research carried out by The Ear Foundation, with funding from the National Deaf Children’s Society (NDCS), is being published today. The research highlights issues that children with mild to moderate deafness encounter, gathered from the views of their parents and Teachers of the Deaf.

I previously blogged about mild deafness when NDCS ran a pilot weekend for families with children with mild deafness, who reported similar feelings to the new report findings. Common themes included lack of understanding of the impact of mild to moderate deafness on family and education and a belief that the terms “mild” and “moderate” are not helpful in describing the potential impact for a lot of children.

This blog provides a reminder of the impact of mild and moderate deafness and explores why this impact is so often overlooked.

Impact of mild deafness

  • A child can usually hear everything that is said to them in a quiet room, but not if there is lots of noise present or they are far away from the speaker.
  • A child would not be able to follow a whispered conversation.
  • Some children with mild deafness use hearing aids.
  • A child with glue ear will usually have mild deafness.
  • A child with mild deafness will miss 25% to 50% of the teacher’s voice in a classroom.
  • The teacher’s voice is typically heard at about 70dB at the front and 40 dB at the back of the class. A child with mild deafness (21-40 dB) will typically not hear anything of the teacher’s voice at the back of the class.

Impact of moderate deafness

  • Most children with moderate deafness use hearing aids.
  • Without their hearing aids, they could hear most of what someone says to them in a quiet room as long as they speak clearly, but could not follow a conversation in a large group, if there is lots of background noise or they are far away from the speaker.
  • A child with moderate loss will miss over 50% of the teacher’s voice in a classroom.

Why is the impact of mild and moderate deafness so often overlooked?
Adults can find it very difficult to understand the impact of mild and moderate deafness on children. This is because any child they meet with a mild and moderate deafness is likely to have clear speech and be able to answer questions asked directly of them. But classrooms are typically noisy and background noise can have a significant impact on speech understanding for a child with mild and moderate deafness. This is because the adult brain is much better at filtering out background noise than a child’s.

Also, the adult brain is very good at filling in the gaps of missed information – speech sounds or parts of words – that weren’t heard. Children with mild and moderate deafness are not able to do this – they lack the knowledge, vocabulary and context to be able to fill in the gaps. This means they miss out on a lot of the new vocabulary and concepts being taught every day at school.

Diagnosis
Newborn hearing screening does not usually identify mild hearing loss in very young babies because it is designed to pick up greater levels of deafness, and many children develop hearing loss during early childhood. It is important that parents and health professionals are vigilant about the child’s development and refer them to an audiologist at any stage if they are concerned about their hearing or speech development.

Parents’ views should be taken seriously. If they have concerns about a child’s hearing they should be referred for testing without delay.

Once a hearing loss is identified it’s vital a child is offered information, advice and possibly hearing aids or other intervention as soon as possible. It isn’t acceptable that they wait longer because their hearing loss is viewed as being more borderline or not as ‘significant’ as other children’s.

What can be done to help?
The research report calls for more support to parents and young people with mild and moderate deafness. It also calls for teachers to have greater awareness of the impact that mild and moderate deafness can have and for local authorities to ensure that services are sufficiently resourced to provide the necessary support.

NDCS’s website has more information about the resources available to families of children with mild or moderate deafness.