Support our Thunderclap!

NDCS, Sam Aldridge

Sam Aldridge, Campaigns Officer

At the end of September we’ll be launching our new campaign Listen Up! to improve audiology services for deaf children and young people.

We want to make sure as many people as possible know about our campaign; to do this we’ve set up a Thunderclap. Thunderclap is an application that allows you to register your social media accounts (facebook, twitter and tumblr) to send a pre-written message out at a set time. It means that we can rally all of our supporters to send a campaign message out at exactly the same time to have a bigger impact. The more people that sign up to support the Thunderclap, the more people will know about our campaign and help us to take action! It only takes a minute to sign up so please add your voice to our campaign.

Please sign up here to support our campaign message today!

If you sign up, you’ll be able to see the campaign message that will be sent out at 12pm on Monday 29th September.

Thunderclap will ask you to authorise the app and allow it to post to your social media account, don’t worry, it will only post the message you are approving about our campaign and won’t post anything else to your account.

On Monday 29th September we’ll be asking you to email a copy of the Listen Up! report to your MP to ask them to take action to improve audiology services for deaf children and young people. To find out more about how you can get involved join the NDCS Campaigns Network today. 

5 articles the Campaigns Team has been reading this week

NDCS, Sam Aldridge

Sam Aldridge, Campaigns Assistant

This week’s articles were compiled by Sam Aldridge, Campaigns Assistant at the National Deaf Children’s Society (NDCS).

Every week we’ll be compiling a short list of articles that we’ve noticed in the news and want to share with you. Some of them will be about campaigning and others will be about changes to policy, or relevant policy areas, which may be of interest.

1)   Lobbying Bill: keep calm and carry on campaigning, Liz Hutchins, Guardian Voluntary Sector

The Lobbying Act is a hard pill for charities to swallow. Liz Hutchins explains why it is essential that the sector gets behind the fight to repeal the bill.

2)  David Cameron’s house ‘fracked’ by protestors, Miranda Prynne, The Telegraph

Greenpeace protestors turn the Prime Minister’s country home into a ‘fracking site’ in protest at new pro-drilling laws, the environmental group reveals.

3)   GCSE and A-Level subject range set to be cut back, Sean Coughlan, BBC News

Exam reforms in England will see tougher qualifications for some GCSE and A-level subjects, while others could be scrapped, a watchdog has said.

4)   Now’s the time to make our ask of the political parties, Elizabeth Balgobin, Third Sector

With the general election approaching, charities must state loudly and clearly what they need to do their work, writes columnist Elizabeth Balgobin.

5)   NHS risks ‘chaotic failure’ if parties do not come up with plan to save itCharlie CooperThe Independent

All three political parties must publicly acknowledge the financial crisis faced by the NHS and put solutions at the heart of their 2015 General Election manifestos, health chiefs have said.

Have you seen any articles this week that you liked? Post the link to them in the comments section below and we’ll check them out!

It’s Deaf Awareness Week – what can you do?

NDCS, Sam Aldridge

Sam Aldridge, Campaigns Assistant

This week we’re celebrating Deaf Awareness Week – 19th-25th May

Whether you have a few minutes or an hour there are lots of ways to get involved with Deaf Awareness Week. Have a look at a few of our suggestions below:

Read and share our 11 tips for communicating with a deaf child as a quick guide to general deaf awareness

5 articles the Campaigns Team has been reading this week

NDCS, Sam Aldridge

Sam Aldridge, Campaigns Assistant

Every week we’ll be compiling a short list of articles that we’ve noticed in the news and want to share with you. Some of them will be about campaigning and others will be about changes to policy, or relevant policy areas, which may be of interest.

1)     Halifax bank apologises for asking deaf man to pay £25 for transaction that hearing people could do for free, Andy Palmer, Limping Chicken

 A deaf man from Slough was told by staff at his local branch of Halifax Bank that he would need to pay a £25 admin fee if he wanted staff to resolve a simple  banking problem that people who can hear would be able to do for free.

2)   Young people should be at the forefront of charity campaigns, Leon Ward, Guardian Voluntary Sector Network

Charities can learn a lot from the FGM campaign, which has been successfully fronted by a young person, says Leon Ward.

3)   Meet the extraordinary woman who became a health campaigner after being diagnosed with terminal breast cancer aged 23, Lizzie Edmonds, Mail Online 

After several rounds of chemotherapy, Kris, who will never be cancer-free and receives monthly treatment in hospital, is one of the most prolific cancer campaigners in the country thanks to her charity CoppaFeel!

4)   Lobbying is crucial to our sector so why no ‘Institute of Campaigning’?, Brian Lamb, Third Sector

A threat to charity campaigning is posed not only by the lobbying act, but also by our own inability to demonstrate that we can make a difference in the long term.

5)   Students could be paying loans into their 50s, Katherine Sellgren, BBC News

Most students will still be paying back loans from their university days in their 40s and 50s, and many will never clear the debt, research finds.

Have you spotted any good articles around this week? Leave a comment below to share them with us!

5 articles the Campaigns Team has been reading this week

NDCS, Sam Aldridge

Sam Aldridge, Campaigns Assistant

Every week we’ll be compiling a short list of articles that we’ve noticed in the news and want to share with you. Some of them will be about campaigning and others will be about changes to policy, or relevant policy areas, that may be of interest.

1)    Children and Families Act: Budget cuts will undermine SEN reforms warn charities , Laura McCardle, Children and Young People Now

Special educational needs (SEN) charities fear cuts to council budgets and inadequate guidance for professionals will undermine reforms made under the Children and Families Act.

2)    Striving to be heard in a world without sound , Henry Hepburn, TES Scotland

Deaf students must contend with ignorance, bullying and poor provision, writes Henry Hepburn. Yet they are entering further education in large numbers – when will the sector catch up?

3)   Ofsted inspections: ‘you’d be better off flipping a coin’ Padraic Flanagan, The Telegraph

The schools watchdog is criticised over the quality of its inspectors in a report by a right-leaning think tank founded by Michael Gove, the Education Secretary.

4)    How does money influence health?, Michaela Benzaval et al, Joseph Rowntree Foundation

This study looks at hundreds of theories to consider how income influences health. There is a graded association between money and health – increased income equates to better health. But the reasons are debated.

5)    No make-up selfies: women on Facebook and Twitter post bare-faced photos to help raise breast cancer awareness , Kashmira Gander, The Independent

The no make-up selfie craze has divided users online, with some arguing the trend is not the best way to help to fight the disease.

Have you spotted any good articles around this week? Leave a comment below to share them with us!