New guidance increases cochlear implant eligibility

Today the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) published new guidance on who should be considered a candidate for cochlear implants.

Background

Lady looking at the camera, with a PC desk next to her and a bookshelf behind her.

Vicki Kirwin, Development Manager (Audiology & Health), National Deaf Children’s Society.

The previous guidance was issued in 2009. The guidance forms part of the Technical Appraisal portfolio and as such the NHS is expected to make funding available for anyone who meets the criteria and wishes to have the procedure.

The previous guidance said that children could be offered two cochlear implants if their hearing was worse than 95 dB (profoundly deaf) at 2000 and 4000 Hz (the higher frequencies which are considered most important for speech understanding), if hearing aids weren’t able to provide sufficient benefit to be able to understand speech.

We felt that the previous candidacy criteria was dated and no longer fit for purpose. The UK had slipped into a position where we had one of the highest candidacy requirements in the developed world.

Recent research found that cochlear implants would be appropriate for children with lower hearing thresholds than the current guidelines and this meant that many children with profound deafness and cochlear implants were hearing better than children with severe deafness and hearing aids.

Whilst NICE guidance should only be seen as guidance and clinical judgement should also be applied, in practice NHS England refused to fund candidates outside of the identified criteria. This left a significant number of frustrated families (and professionals) who knew of the potential benefits but were unable to access services due to funding restrictions.

We got involved in a research Consensus Group and worked with both the British Cochlear Implant Group (BCIG) and the Action Group on Adult Cochlear Implants so that there is a uniform response to NICE from the sector.

New guidance

Now says that children with severe to profound deafness (defined as hearing only sounds that are louder than 80 dB HL at 2 or more frequencies of 500 Hz, 1,000 Hz, 2,000 Hz, and 4,000 Hz) in both ears, and who do not receive adequate benefit from hearing aids are candidates. Adequate benefit is defined as speech, language and listening skills appropriate to age, developmental stage and cognitive ability.

The National Deaf Children’s Society’s position

We thoroughly welcome these changes. NICE haven’t gone as far as we would have really liked (such as providing candidature for children with profound unilateral deafness or children with aidable hearing in one ear but not the other) but it is a massive improvement and means we won’t be behind many European countries as now.

However, the National Deaf Children’s Society’s work does not end here. The new candidature means that many more children now meet the criteria for cochlear implant assessment for already stretched services with ongoing NHS funding pressures. We will be working hard to ensure that services are adequately funded, available, and of good quality for every family that needs them.

If you need any further information or help and support contact our Helpline on 0808 800 8880 (calls are free from all landlines and major mobiles companies), live chat or helpline@ndcs.org.uk.

General Election 2017. Deaf young people matter.

Martin-Mclean-cropped

Martin McLean, Education and Training Policy Advisor (Post-14), National Deaf Children’s Society

Less than half of young people aged 18-24 are expected to vote on June 8th. Personally, I think this is a tragedy as it means that politicians may be less focused on trying to win young people over because this will not be the key to winning elections. It can be argued that policies on housing, benefits or higher education, for example, might be different if more young people voted.

We at the National Deaf Children’s Society want to make sure that the needs of young people are high on the agenda. We have some key asks for each of the parties to help ensure deaf young people have bright futures. For this year’s general election they are:

    1. Ensure deaf young people receive access to specialist careers advice. Imagine as a deaf young person thinking about what you want to do in the future but you did not know you had rights under the Equality Act or that there was funding for communication support and technology in the workplace (Access to Work). Sadly, this is the reality for many deaf young people and we believe it influences their subject choices at school and college. We want all deaf young people to have access to specialist careers advice so that they are better informed to make choices about their futures.
    2.  Revamp the Access to Work employment support scheme. As a user of the Access to Work I can say I probably could not do my job without it – it pays for the communication support I need to access meetings and training. However, when applying for the first time you will need to very clear about what support and how much of it you need. We don’t believe the application process is friendly for young people and would like to see specialist advice from dedicated champions when they apply for the first time, as well as support that it is flexible and tailored to their needs.
    3. Make it easier for deaf young people to complete apprenticeships. The main political parties are keen on apprenticeships. So are we. High-quality apprenticeships can be a good way of ensuring deaf young people gain vital work experience alongside achieving qualifications. We believe the funding system for additional support on apprenticeships is currently unsatisfactory and needs to be improved and simplified.

Help us put the needs of deaf young people on the agenda by asking the parliamentary candidates for your area what they would do on the above issues if elected to parliament. Also, if you know any deaf young people over 18, encourage them to register to vote- they do matter!

What are the political parties offering deaf children and young people?

Beccy Forrow Campaigns Officer, National Deaf Children's Society

Beccy Forrow Campaigns Officer, National Deaf Children’s Society

We know that for most parents of deaf children, the support that politicians are promising for deaf children’s services is a top election priority.

We’ve given you our roundup of the manifesto commitments affecting deaf children over the last few weeks but perhaps you’d like to hear from the parties themselves?

With this in mind, check out the debate on See Hear about the parties’ plans for policies affecting the deaf community – it might help you to decide where to put your cross on 7 May!

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b05q1072/see-hear-series-35-1-election

The debate features:

  • Mark Harper, Conservative, former Minister for Disabled People
  • Kate Green, Labour, Shadow Spokesperson for Disabled People
  • Star Etheridge, UKIP, Disability Spokesperson
  • Steve Webb, Liberal Democrats, former Minister of State for Pensions

Representatives from the Green party, Plaid Cymru, the Scottish National Party, Democratic Unionist Party and Sinn Fein, were also asked for their views on some of the issues affecting deaf people.

A few questions were asked that relate directly to deaf children and young people, in particular:

  • What will the parties do about the decline in numbers of Teachers of the Deaf and how will they make sure they are well qualified in BSL? – 18.10 mins
  • Should there be a GCSE in BSL? – 22.48 mins
  • How will the parties ensure deaf children have a good quality of life? – 48.10 mins

Watch the programme and make up your own mind about which party has the best offer for deaf children and young people….

If you want to find out more about what the parties are proposing, you can ask your prospective parliamentary candidates. They need your vote and hopefully will be responsive to any questions you might have! Ask your candidates what they know about deaf children and call on them to protect the services that they rely on in the next Parliament.

The Your Next MP website also has information on the candidates in your area and our website has more information on the election, including a detailed election factsheet.

And….don’t forget to vote on Thursday!