My experience of Labour party conference…

Erin 1

Erin McKay

Hello, I am Erin and I’m from Wiltshire. I have a hearing loss and wear two hearing aids. I am currently doing A Level History, Philosophy and English Literature. I attended the Labour Party Conference and I’d like to tell you a bit about my experience.

On Sunday 24 September I got on the train to Brighton. It took a little under four hours to get there. I was on my way to the Labour Party conference where I had 8 meetings lined up to talk about three campaigns that the NDCS are doing. They are Listen Up to improve children’s audiology services, Right to Sign, putting British Sign Language (BSL) in schools as a GCSE and PIP’d Off, about Personal Independence Payments, and the difficulties that deaf people have in getting them. I talked about the Right to Sign campaign as it was the one I helped create with the last Youth Advisory Board.

On the Monday, Brighton was quite rainy and we arrived at the hotel at around 10am to get ready for our first meeting, it was with Sharon Hodgson, the MP for Sunderland West. She is the Shadow Minister for Public Health. She was really nice and we talked about Listen Up, Right to Sign and PIP.

Erin and Sharon

While we were talking with her, the next MP arrived – Alex Cunningham of Stockton. He was also really nice. He gave us some ideas of what to do with the campaigns and who to talk to about different bits. He agreed to ask his local hospital to sign up to the inspections for Listen Up!

Our next meeting was with Liz Twist who is the new MP for Blaydon. We talked about Listen Up! and Right to Sign. Afterwards we met Stephanie Peacock who is also a new MP, for Barnsley. She agreed to ask her local hospital to be part of the inspection process and we also talked about Right to Sign and having Teachers of the Deaf in Schools. We then had a break for lunch and walked around the exhibitions.

After lunch, we saw Jeremy Corbyn and John McDonnell. I managed to get my picture taken with both of them. Our next meeting was with Dawn Butler, the MP who signed a question in parliament. We talked to her about Right to Sign, and she seemed surprised to see that I couldn’t sign. She had already done most of what we wanted to ask her to do, and she was happy to talk about other things to help our campaigns. Next was Helen Goodman who had done a lot of work already with the National Deaf Children’s Society and she was very happy to help us. We talked about Right to Sign, Listen Up and PIP.

Erin labour

Our last meeting was with Tracy Brabin, who was friends with Jo Cox, who I wrote a bit about loneliness for. We also talked about Listen Up and Right to Sign. I had a really good time and would like to do it again.

The best bit of my day was seeing the taxi drivers showing their support for the Uber ban in London by beeping their horns. It went on for about 20 minutes and was really loud! I also liked meeting all the different MPs. Top tips from me for conference are: to share – talk to the MPs and ask questions if you don’t understand something; they are ordinary people.

Right to Sign Campaign

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Sophia James, Senior Participation Officer (Campaigns) National Deaf Children’s Society

After a lively debate at a residential event in 2015, a group of 16 deaf young people voted to campaign about British Sign Language. Now, 18 months later, following our charity’s largest ever consultation of young people, their campaign for a British Sign Language (BSL) GCSE and Scottish National 4/5 in schools has finally launched.

Our board are campaigning for the Right to Sign and we want you to give your support to this campaign. To explain what the campaign is about, Beth and Aliko have filmed this video.

There are lots of reasons to get behind this campaign and Frankie, from the YAB, explains in her vlog why she thinks it’s a good idea for young people to have access to learning sign language.

Here’s how you can get involved:

Read our report

Sign our petition

There is also a different action for each country in the UK, which you can find here.

So thanks for your support and let’s make the #righttosign a reality in schools.

Husna’s Story: Why I’m campaigning to save the Overland Day Nursery

Parent Campaigner

Husna Begum, Parent Campaigner

Hello, my name is Husna Begum. I am a mother of a deaf child and I am also the chair for the Tower Hamlets Deaf Children’s Society (THDCS). My son Hamza was born with profound sensi-neurol hearing loss. He underwent surgery for bilateral cochlear implants aged 17 months. Previous to this, he had no access to sound whatsoever. Hamza is now 4 and attends a mainstream school with a Deaf resource Base, and is doing extremely well. His speech is coming along fantastically and so is his range of sign language. It’s when you see your child develop and improve day by day that you feel proud as a parent. You feel as though there is hope after all. I have had fantastic support from the Teachers of the Deaf in Tower Hamlets who have stood by and supported me and my son throughout his early years.

I became Chair for Tower Hamlets Deaf Children’s Society in September 2014. I can honestly say that it has been challenging and exciting at the same time. Since September the THDCS have had a lot going on. We organised our annual deaf picnic, which we held at Mile End Children’ Play park. The children and their families had a great time and we had a very good turnout. We had an entertainer, bake sale and much more. Our picnic event was written about in the East End Life newspaper. I have attended training days organised by the NDCS to make sure I am able to fulfil my role. However becoming Chair has not always been a happy event. We were shocked to learn that Overland day Nursery was under threat of closure/privatization by Tower Hamlets Local Authority. Overland day nursery is a unique nursery. It’s the only one that provides a resource base for the deaf/partially hearing children in the borough. The nursery provides the much needed early intervention to help support and maximise the children’s listening and speech and language development.

Image of Tower Hamlets Deaf Children's Society

Tower Hamlets Deaf Children’s Society Committee (Husna centre) Image courtesy of Tower Hamlets Deaf Children’s Society

Overland day nursery was attended by my son Hamza at the age of 22 months. During his time at the nursery he made a huge improvement in his listening and communication skills. He had picked up on a vast array of sign language and was able to differentiate between different types of sounds. He became a confident little boy and started to use speech. I was overwhelmed with his improvement, a child who never spoke, started to call me mum. As a parent it was the most memorable and beautiful moment. The staff at Overland are an invaluable asset. They are specialised in all things deaf related, British sign Language and knowing how to deal with hearing aids and cochlear implants. They provide support and empower the deaf children with a sense of belonging in the deaf community and integrating them with their hearing peers. The nursery is purposely built to meet the needs of the deaf children. The rooms are soundproofed and have good acoustics. All this is needed to maximise their listening potential. In a deaf child’s life this is a very sensitive time when their brain is ready to learn. If these learning opportunities are missed it will be even harder to learn these skills later on in life. My son had the best start in life and was given the opportunity to access early years support. I know that he can achieve anything. However, this may not be a possibility to others if the nursery is taken away.

THDCS have been attending meetings and protests to help stop the proposal from going ahead.

As part of our ongoing campaign I have started a petition, I hope you will show your support for this vital service and sign.

Thank you.