5 Ways A Radio Aid Can Help A Deaf Toddler

Alison Taylor, Senior Information Editor, National Deaf Children’s Society

Compelling evidence shows (see the research) that giving deaf children radio aids in the critical early years, before they start school, can be hugely beneficial for developing their language and supporting communication. But in which everyday situations can they help? Here’s our top five.

1. Family time at home
Whether it’s playing a game together, reading a story before bedtime or talking to your child when they’re in the garden or another room, a radio aid can help deaf children hear their parent’s voice clearly and directly, making them feel connected to their parents and helping build strong relationships.

2. Communicating in the car
When you’re driving you can’t turn to your child to sign, or for them to lip-read you, so being able to communicate effectively is vital when parents are travelling with their child. Radio aids can cut through the background noise of the car engine and the road, allowing you to soothe them if they’re having a tantrum, talk about where you’re going in the car and even play games to make the journey more fun!

3. At nursery or pre-school
Early years settings can be fantastic places for children to get a head start in developing their language and communication before they start school, but they can also be noisy places. Nursery staff can use a radio aid to get a deaf child’s attention to make sure they’re taking part in activities fully and mixing with other children, as well as starting to learn.

4. Staying safe when out and about
You’re at the park and your child is about to walk into the path of a swing, or worse – they let go of your hand and are headed straight for a road – how do you stop them when they can’t hear you calling after them? A radio aid means that your child can hear you at a distance and it will cut through the background noise so you can alert them to danger.

Helen and Alex tell us how a radio aid keeps their three-year-old daughter, Gwen, safe when crossing the road and riding her bike.

5. Actually, whenever they can’t see you
As a parent of a deaf child, you’ll often need to stop what you’re doing and face your child to get their attention and to talk to them, whether you’re out shopping, your child is in a pushchair or in a seat on the back of your bike – whenever they can’t see you. Being deaf aware and creating good conditions for listening are still important, but a radio aid can be a great help for busy parents in those everyday noisy situations that you just can’t control.

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Think radio aids might be right for your child?

Find out more about radio aids and how to get one by downloading our booklet for families How Radio Aids Can Help.

Try out a radio aid for free through our Technology Test Drive service.

Read our Quality Standards for the Use of Personal Radio Aids which sets out a common approach to providing radio aids for deaf children.

Watch our video of a group of mums who tell us how they use a radio aid when out and about with their child.

 

“We must all do whatever we can”

Sally Etchells, Policy and Campaigns Officer, National Deaf Children’s Society

I recently interviewed Caroline and Anthony, members of our campaigns network and also parents to three children, Emily, Jack and Thomas. Thomas is ten months old and profoundly deaf. He also has a very rare condition called CHARGE syndrome which means he has additional needs. I spoke to Caroline and Anthony about why being a part of the campaigns network is important to them. 

 Why did you join the campaigns network? “We need to defend the services that are so vital to Thomas, our family and other deaf children. Thomas cannot tell people himself how much he needs, enjoys or how much he gets from the service so it is up to us to be his voice and to make sure that it is heard”. 

 What have you recently campaigned on? “We found out that Manchester City Council was planning to cut the Sensory Support Service for deaf children so, given how much we rely on this service, we knew we couldn’t stand by and let them do this without a fight.”

 Update: With the help of many parents and local campaigners, we managed to reduce the planned cuts in Manchester. We will now be working closely with the local authority to ensure deaf children in Manchester continue to get the right support.

 What kind of campaigning tactics did you use? “We responded to the council’s consultation and also wrote a letter to the council outlining how our whole family relies on the service. We also wrote to our local MP about the cuts and asked him to reject them on our behalf. He wrote to the council and supported us. Having your local MP on board really does make a difference.”

 What do you get from NDCS? “It is great that we can contact NDCS directly for advice or to answer any questions we have. They have travelled over to Manchester to meet with us and to gather feedback on how the changes affect us”.  

 Why should other people sign up to the network? “It is up to parents to stand up and fight for their children. We cannot allow our deaf children to be disadvantaged either now or in the future as cuts will affect children perpetually. We must all do whatever we can.” 

 Our campaigns network is made up of around 7,000 people who are passionate about campaigning to protect valuable services for deaf children and young people. The network is open to anyone and is completely free to join. Our campaigns network members take action on local and national levels to make sure services for deaf children are defended. Join the campaigns network today to be the first to find out about campaign actions in your area and to receive regular updates from the team:

http://e-activist.com/ea-action/action?ea.client.id=19&ea.campaign.id=45735&ea.tracking.id=TA

 

 

Could you help a family struggling with their child’s deafness?

Joanne O'Donnell

Joanne O’Donnell, Everyone Together Project Officer (Parenting)

The Everyone Together project will be recruiting parent/carer volunteers to support our work. Could you spare some time to volunteer with us? Project Officer Joanne O’Donnell explains more:

“The Everyone Together project supports families with a deaf child aged 0-8 years in Scotland. We are committed to building support around deaf children, beginning with the family, and bringing in professionals and the wider community.

If you remember back to when your child was diagnosed, chances are you remember that feeling of being alone. By recruiting parent volunteers, we hope that Everyone Together will provide families with emotional support from someone who has been in their position. There is nothing more encouraging than knowing someone has been through a similar situation and reached the other side.”

Interested? Read on to find out more.

What will I be asked to do?

We have a number of volunteer opportunities and we would work with you to identify the best role for you. Tasks undertaken by volunteers include:

  • Talking to parents with a newly identified deaf child. Sharing your experiences and explaining about the support we can offer;
  • Giving talks to parents and professionals at workshops, courses and conferences;
  • Speaking to the media about your family, our charity and our services;
  • Supporting a parent/carer to attend one of our events by accompanying them or meeting them at the event.

How much time will I be asked to commit?

It’s up to you – let us know what you can commit to, and we will let you know which opportunities might best suit your availability.

What support will I receive?

You will receive training and ongoing support in your role. Your achievements and contribution will be celebrated through an annual recognition event and we will reimburse all out of pocket expenses incurred through your volunteer role.

I would like to volunteer

Great! The first step is to let us know you are interested. You can do this by emailing everyone.together@ndcs.org.uk or by contacting Joanne on 0141 880 7044/ 07837 056 267. We will provide you with more information and an application form.

If you live elsewhere in the UK and would like to know about other volunteering opportunities at National Deaf Children’s Society, please email volunteer@ndcs.org.uk or call 0121 234 9829. Alternatively, you can find current volunteering opportunities on our website.

Make 2017 the year you become an NDCS volunteer.

A Day in the Life of a Parenting Facilitator

 

Anne Frances Mason

Anne-Frances Mason, Raising a Deaf Child Facilitator

Think parenting courses are all naughty steps and no fun? Think again, as Anne-Frances, one of our fabulous facilitators explains…

Many of you will have heard of ‘Raising a Deaf Child’, the parenting course designed and endorsed by National Deaf Children’s Society. For those of you who haven’t, allow me to provide you with a sneaky snapshot of the course.

My background in social work means I have experience of delivering a range of parenting classes over the years. But sorry, I have come to the conclusion that this practice of running participants through programmes from A-Z often leaves people with more questions than answers.

My current role as a Raising a Deaf Child facilitator could not be more different and here’s why:

The shape changes. The sessions might be in workshop form, a one-off weekend, regular blocks of short, sharp sessions or a taster slotted into a special event.

The sequence changes. We might begin at the end and skip backwards. Why? Because parents prioritise the topics and ‘Everyone Together’ listens.

At the heart of my job as facilitator is my duty and privilege to remind every parent and carer of a deaf child that they are the expert when it comes to their child. Parents sometimes forget this. But please don’t forget that we are all different and it is vital that we celebrate the world of differences for each deaf child.

Finally, it is only fair to make mention of the secret ingredients that have made the Raising a Deaf Child a success. Apart from the food, the fun, the ice-breakers and the guest speakers, there is that parent sitting opposite who has experienced almost exactly the same as the parent who is climbing the walls. They’ve been there, they know, and their insight is passed on. Peer power in action.

But don’t just take it from me, come and see for yourself!

The ‘Everyone Together’ project is funded by Big Lottery Fund, and supports families with a deaf child aged 0-8 years in Scotland. To find out more about our 2017 workshops, visit the Everyone Together events page.