Who is celebrating today?

Martin-Mclean-cropped

Martin McLean, Education and Training Policy Advisor (Post-14), National Deaf Children’s Society

Today is A-level results day. This means lots of TV footage of young people opening an envelope and then crying tears of joy as they pull out the sheet of paper that tells them they got the grades they need to get into their chosen university. Certainly for many, today will bring good news but what about deaf young people — how many will be celebrating?

One thing that irritates me about the media’s coverage of A-level results is that it completely ignores the fact there are many young people taking other qualifications than A-levels. Many students are also receiving BTEC and Level 3 diploma results on the same day or a bit earlier but you wouldn’t know it. Were their achievements not worth celebrating too? I think they are.

Sadly, too many deaf young people are not achieving what we call ‘Level 3 qualifications’; these are A-levels, BTECs, diplomas and other qualifications that will enable them to move onto higher education or widen their employment choices. According to Government data in 2017 only 41% of deaf young people in England achieved 2 A-levels or equivalent qualifications by the age of 19. This is a figure we believe is too low (65% of young people without disabilities achieved 2 A-levels or equivalent).

So what were the other 59% doing between the ages of 16 and 19? Most were continuing to work towards Level 2 qualifications (equivalent to GCSE) or below. This is important progress to make in order to be ready to take a Level 3 qualification or to move onto an apprenticeship. In 2017, 74% of deaf young people had achieved the equivalent of 5 GCSEs by the age of 19.

What happens after the age of 19 — do they continue studying or do they go into work? This is where Government data runs out.  We just don’t know and this is why we are commissioning research that will track young people over a period of 5 years, beyond education into employment. Watch this space — we will be releasing more info about this research soon.

If you have achieved your A-levels, BTECs or diploma today then a big congratulations! However, let us spare a thought too for those deaf 18 year olds who are not quite there yet or taking other routes. With the right support to gain the skills they need, some focus and ambition, they too can have bright futures.

Daniel’s Vlog – My Meeting with Nick Gibb

Hi, my name is Daniel and I’m a campaigner. I recently went to the Houses of Parliament in London to meet with the Minister for Schools Standards at the Department for Education, Nick Gibb MP. I asked to meet him because there still isn’t a GCSE in British Sign Language (BSL). This is really unfair to all children who use BSL as their first language. Have a look at my vlog to learn all about my day and my chat with Nick Gibb!

(This video is in BSL with subtitles)

 

 

https://e-activist.com/page/21204/action/1

Shouldn’t all young deaf children and their families have the right to a Radio Aid?

Emma

Emma Fraser- Teacher of the Deaf

Everyday life can be busy and noisy with family gatherings, trips out to playgrounds and activity centres and frequent journeys in the car and the buggy. Having two children myself I know how loud we all can be particularly when my six siblings and their children come round. In fact recent research indicates that young children can spend up to 25% of their day in noisy environments. So knowing what we know about how important it is for young children to hear spoken language in order to develop good communication and language and how babies have to learn how to be good listeners, why can’t all deaf pre-school children be considered for a radio aid at the same time as they are fitted for a hearing aid? 

We think every family should have the right to try a radio aid, from an early age, so they can see if it would work well for them. Our research shows that it can have big benefits. If you would like to try one, you can talk to your audiologist and Teacher of the Deaf about radio aids. As soon as your child has hearing aids or a cochlear implant, discuss options with your Teacher of the Deaf about trying out a radio aid at home. It may take some getting used to and you don’t need to use it all the time, but when you think about the times your child is in a noisy place or behind you in the car, it will be then that your child could really benefit from hearing your voice clearly.

So here are some things you may want to consider when using a radio aid with a baby or toddler.

  • Think about the best time to use the radio aid for you and your child, it may be in the car, when you are sharing a book with a sibling, or playing with your child at toddler group. Take a look at this short video to see how a family used a radio aid to help communication.
  • All the family can use the radio aid, so pass it around when another family member is interacting with your child
  • Radio aids use up battery power so you will need to change the batteries in your child’s hearing aids more frequently
  • Place the microphone carefully. About 15cm from your mouth is best and avoid wearing anything that will knock against it as the sound will travel straight into your child’s ears.
  • Don’t forget to use the mute button, there are some conversations your child doesn’t need to hear.

Unfortunately, radio aids are not always available for use in the home or for pre-school deaf children. We’re campaigning for them to be more widely available – local authorities will need to ensure that services have the resources to fund, maintain and monitor the equipment.

Remember the best communication happens in a quiet environment, when you are close to you child, they can see your face and you are sharing experiences, but when this isn’t possible consider trying a radio aid. If you’d like more information about radio aids, take a look at our website.

 

Getting the right advice

Martin-Mclean-cropped

Martin McLean, Education and Training Policy Advisor (Post-14), National Deaf Children’s Society

When I was a boy what I wanted to be when I was older changed regularly – I wanted to be a teacher, then a weather man and then a journalist and then it was a solicitor. As I grew older and had to seriously consider my options at GCSE followed by A-levels, the doubts crept in – would these jobs be suitable for me? Would the communication barrier be too great? ‘Focus on what you are good at’ I was told and I settled on the biological sciences in the end, following in my parents’ footsteps. Working in laboratory should be ok for a deaf person – there will be opportunities there, I thought to myself.

I was right – there were opportunities. After graduating in Genetics, I worked in a lab for a few months but I soon realised that this type of work was not for me. It was not because I was deaf – I know a few deaf scientists and they love their work. I just felt I had not followed my passions and had settled for the safe option.

It was in 1995 that I took my GCSEs and it was only in that year that disability discrimination laws were introduced. Access to Work, a Government scheme which can cover the costs of communication support in employment, was launched at the same time. I did not know anything about Access to Work or about my rights in employment until much later but I wish I had. I might then have had the courage to follow my passions. This is why I believe good careers advice does matter. Sadly, our research tells us too many young people are not getting this.

Last week, the Government launched a careers strategy which aims to make sure young people receive better careers advice in schools and colleges in England. Refreshingly, for a Government policy document, the needs of young people with disabilities were considered at several points within the strategy. The highlights in relation to deaf young people are:

  • Schools and colleges will be expected to use the Gatsby Benchmarks to improve careers provision. One these benchmarks is ‘addressing the needs of each pupil’ – particularly important for deaf young people.
  • Every school or college will have a Careers Leader who will be expected to prioritise careers support for ‘disadvantaged’ young people including young people with disabilities.
  • 20 Careers Hubs will be set up across England that will be focused on groups of young people ‘most in need of targeted support.’
  • The Careers and Enterprise Company and the Gatsby Foundation will work together to set out good practice in supporting young people with disabilities.

The strategy has the potential to make a difference. Unfortunately, it is not backed by much in the way of extra funding which may limit the ability of the new Careers Hubs and Careers Leaders to reach out to significant numbers of young people. Still, it is better than nothing.

The Careers Strategy only applies to England. Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland have their own careers policies and we know there are issues in those countries too. Wherever, you live we expect deaf young people to be getting tailored advice.

If you live or work with deaf young people, you too can play your part. Our website has videos aimed at young people thinking about their futures that you can signpost to. We are also looking at how we can further develop our resources around careers so watch this space! If you have any views about what we could produce – let us know in the comment boxes below.

PS – I did leave the laboratory by the way. 15 years, several roles and two more university degrees later, here I am as an Education and Training Policy Advisor for the National Deaf Children’s Society, a job I much enjoy!

My experience of Labour party conference…

Erin 1

Erin McKay

Hello, I am Erin and I’m from Wiltshire. I have a hearing loss and wear two hearing aids. I am currently doing A Level History, Philosophy and English Literature. I attended the Labour Party Conference and I’d like to tell you a bit about my experience.

On Sunday 24 September I got on the train to Brighton. It took a little under four hours to get there. I was on my way to the Labour Party conference where I had 8 meetings lined up to talk about three campaigns that the NDCS are doing. They are Listen Up to improve children’s audiology services, Right to Sign, putting British Sign Language (BSL) in schools as a GCSE and PIP’d Off, about Personal Independence Payments, and the difficulties that deaf people have in getting them. I talked about the Right to Sign campaign as it was the one I helped create with the last Youth Advisory Board.

On the Monday, Brighton was quite rainy and we arrived at the hotel at around 10am to get ready for our first meeting, it was with Sharon Hodgson, the MP for Sunderland West. She is the Shadow Minister for Public Health. She was really nice and we talked about Listen Up, Right to Sign and PIP.

Erin and Sharon

While we were talking with her, the next MP arrived – Alex Cunningham of Stockton. He was also really nice. He gave us some ideas of what to do with the campaigns and who to talk to about different bits. He agreed to ask his local hospital to sign up to the inspections for Listen Up!

Our next meeting was with Liz Twist who is the new MP for Blaydon. We talked about Listen Up! and Right to Sign. Afterwards we met Stephanie Peacock who is also a new MP, for Barnsley. She agreed to ask her local hospital to be part of the inspection process and we also talked about Right to Sign and having Teachers of the Deaf in Schools. We then had a break for lunch and walked around the exhibitions.

After lunch, we saw Jeremy Corbyn and John McDonnell. I managed to get my picture taken with both of them. Our next meeting was with Dawn Butler, the MP who signed a question in parliament. We talked to her about Right to Sign, and she seemed surprised to see that I couldn’t sign. She had already done most of what we wanted to ask her to do, and she was happy to talk about other things to help our campaigns. Next was Helen Goodman who had done a lot of work already with the National Deaf Children’s Society and she was very happy to help us. We talked about Right to Sign, Listen Up and PIP.

Erin labour

Our last meeting was with Tracy Brabin, who was friends with Jo Cox, who I wrote a bit about loneliness for. We also talked about Listen Up and Right to Sign. I had a really good time and would like to do it again.

The best bit of my day was seeing the taxi drivers showing their support for the Uber ban in London by beeping their horns. It went on for about 20 minutes and was really loud! I also liked meeting all the different MPs. Top tips from me for conference are: to share – talk to the MPs and ask questions if you don’t understand something; they are ordinary people.

There’s a gaping hole in our ability to support our most vulnerable children

Chris Mullen

Chris Mullen, Social Care Policy Advisor

By 2020, in just 3 years’ time councils will be facing a £2 billion funding gap for children’s social care services[1].The figure is eye-watering, but recently a collection of academics, researchers, parliamentarians, practitioners, England’s Children’s Commissioner, but sadly not the new Children’s Minister, gathered at the latest All Party Parliamentary Group on Children to discuss the state of children’s social care services in England. Not one person in the packed committee room disputed this figure, including the Director of the National Children’s Bureau who stated there was a clear crisis in children’s social care funding.

The meeting discussed a survey of 1600 social workers -the vast majority reporting that the bar is becoming higher and higher for children and families to get support by children’s services.[2] It’s hardly surprising.

As my last blog reported, it is only recently that the previous Conservative administration acknowledged the funding crisis in adult social care, with councils now being allowed to raise additional money through ring fenced council tax rises. But why has this not happened in children’s social care?

Is this because children don’t have immediate political power, as ageing or grey voters do, being able to trigger the issuing of P45’s of previous MP’s at the stroke of a pencil at the ballet box? Or is that children’s social care support is perceived by many voters as somehow about undeserving children or that children who receive social care support are in families who should be meeting those children’s needs and not the state?

If in these times of austerity the moral argument has been won to support the needs of our vulnerable elderly population, we must do all we can to persuade our politicians to extend this to children who are equally vulnerable!

Deaf and disabled children are also sometimes supported by children’s social care; but with resources and demand pressures, these children are getting reduced levels of support or are only experiencing social care involvement at the point where preventing abuse and neglect occurs- rather than the safety net support of services to help children and families. Sadly this reinforces the view of those children and families as being undeserving.

This is to be expected where the law is too narrow, and local authorities are not legally required to provide early intervention and early help services to children and families. This is despite mounting evidence showing that if targeted well, these services can prevent more costly state intervention later on[3]. With limited resources, many local authorities are striving to innovate to meet rising demand for services, but ultimately have to intervene to protect children who have suffered significant harm or at risk of immediate harm.

Sometimes when a crisis occurs, new or alternative ways of thinking emerge. In 1946 Britain was broke and devastated by WW2, yet during this time of austerity it took the wisdom of a few to create the NHS which despite its problems, is fiercely supported. We need a similar revolution now. Investing in a safety net of support for all children and families as a democratic right will reap benefits for the whole of society –and that includes those who disagree with such a measure who cannot escape living alongside children and families! And also as a final thought, weren’t we all once children?

Previous Blog

https://ndcscampaigns.com/category/social-care/

[1] https://www.local.gov.uk/about/news/councils-face-2-billion-funding-gap-support-vulnerable-children-2020

[2] https://www.cypnow.co.uk/cyp/news/2004211/child-protection-thresholds-rising-due-to-budget-pressures

[3] https://www.ncb.org.uk/resources-publications/resources/no-good-options-report-inquiry-childrens-social-care-england

“Involving deaf young people in the technology they use is the best way to make sure it meets their needs for the future”

Lucy Read

Lucy Read, Head of Children and Young People Participation

Technology has come a long way over the past couple of decades. Those of you who can remember dial-up networks, floppy discs and MSN will be well aware of how much technology has changed over time.

If you have absolutely no idea what I’m wittering on about ­– that is proof of just how quickly technology moves on. What was current one minute and everyone was using can quickly change and adapt with people’s changing needs.

But how often do deaf young people get to share their needs, wants and wishes for the technology they use or might want? Our experience is not very often.

We are hoping to change this by launching an exciting new Design Your Own Tech competition for young people aged 12–18; giving deaf young people across the UK the chance to showcase their tech talents.

We created the competition to raise awareness of the daily challenges the UK’s 50,000 deaf youngsters face, and of how technology can help them to overcome these.

Budding deaf designers aged 12–18 have until 13 October to submit their innovative ideas for the tech of the future.

Two lucky winners will get to present their ideas to product manufacturers and those with the power to make their designs a reality. They will also get a prize for their school, and can choose from an iPad, VR headset or Amazon vouchers.

For more information and to enter the competition, go to www.buzz.org.uk.

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