Challenging the crisis in children’s social care

Last month, there was a very important cross-party debate in the Commons about the crisis in children’s social care in England – discussing rising thresholds; cuts to local authority early support services; reductions in social care packages for disabled children; the rising numbers of children being taken into care; and the postcode lottery of spending on children’s social care.

I applaud the work of the All Party Parliamentary Group on Children and their dogged attempts to keep this issue in the spotlight and bring this to the attention of government ministers.

Chris Mullen, Social Care Policy Advisor

Chris Mullen, Social Care Policy Advisor, National Deaf Children’s Society

The Government isn’t recognising that there is as a national emergency in social care funding, despite widespread charities, academics, parent groups and the Local Government Association saying there is.

So, during these times of austerity and Brexit, should we simply back off, do nothing and sympathise with the local authorities who are struggling to provide vital local services to deaf children, including education and social care?

Yes and no.

Yes, we do indeed sympathise with position local authorities are in – many of whom say they are simply unable to provide the statutory services they once did but are still are under a legal obligation to provide.

No, because we shouldn’t simply accept this. The law hasn’t changed, the additional support we know deaf children and young people receive hasn’t changed, and many deaf children still fall behind their hearing peers.

From my colleagues in our Policy and Campaigns team to our network of parent and deaf campaigners, our Children and Family Officers, our Helpline team and our Appeals and Disputes advisors – we all work to professionally challenge wherever services are failing in their legal duties to meet the needs of deaf children and young people. The National Deaf Children’s Society is indeed a team effort.

This includes supporting professionals working directly with deaf children. The National Deaf Children’s Society has a free social care advisory service that any professional can call for advice and support.

In these difficult times, we must not be afraid to challenge the issues when necessary but we must equally remain hopeful for this current and future generations of deaf children and young people and their families.

Deaf young people and the Access to Work scheme

What are our top 5 policy asks?

With the right support put in place, deaf young people can work in almost any job role.

Sally Etchells, Policy and Campaigns Officer, National Deaf Children’s Society

Some deaf people rely on communication support or assistive technology in order to be able to do their jobs. This support can be funded by the Access to Work grant scheme which is run by the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP).

The scheme is highly valued by deaf young people because it covers the costs of support, above what might normally be expected of an employer to provide through reasonable adjustments. However, we believe the scheme is underutilised and could work better for young deaf people who are making the crucial move from education into work.

We are working to influence the DWP at the moment, and these are the top five things we are asking for.

  1. We want awareness of Access to Work to be raised among deaf young people and the professionals who work with them. Too many people don’t know anything about Access to Work.
  2. We want it to be easier to claim Access to Work if you are a young person organising work experience for yourself.
  3. For short notice interviews and job start dates, we want the DWP to put a temporary support package in place for people, before their Access to Work grant is approved. If this isn’t put in place, it means that many deaf young people have to miss interviews or delay starting their new job.
  4. Deaf people are the biggest group of claimants of Access to Work. We think this justifies the demand for specialist assessors and advisers that understand deafness. At the moment we hear many accounts of poor customer service and a lack of deaf awareness.
  5. We want the DWP to improve data collection around Access to Work. At the moment, we only have figures on the number of deaf claimants, or young claimants, not both!

You can find out more and apply for Access to Work on the DWP website. Any questions? Contact Sally on campaigns@ndcs.org.uk

Liam’s vlog – What can you do about the £4 million cuts?

Liam, a past member of our Youth Advisory Board has been vlogging all week for #DeafAwarenessWeek2018.

He’s just done his first signed VLOG (Go Liam!) and it’s all about our Stolen Futures campaign.

 

If you haven’t already – don’t forget to email your MP!

P.S: If you want to hear from him – check out his YouTube channel!

£4 million cuts – deaf children’s services at crisis point

Jess-Reeves-cropped

Jess Reeves, Campaigns Manager, National Deaf Children’s Society

Enough is enough. The Government must step up and support deaf children.

One third of councils in England are cutting a total of £4million from their budgets for deaf children’s education.

This comes at the same time as numbers of Teachers of the Deaf are falling and numbers of deaf children are rising. Research published earlier this year shows a ten percent drop in the number of these highly specialised teachers since 2014 and an 11% rise in the number of deaf children from 2016 to 2017. Over half of the remaining teachers are due to retire in the next 10 to 15 years.

Is it any wonder then that despite the Government’s major reform of the special educational needs system in England, two thirds of deaf children are still failing to achieve the key target of a ‘good’ grade 5 in GCSE English and Maths? We know that deaf children who get the right support in their education can do just as well as their hearing friends. This is why the Government must step in to prevent this mounting crisis. We are calling on them to:

• meet with us to discuss this as a matter of urgency
• ensure central government funding keeps pace with the rise in demand for support for deaf children’s education
• take action to train up the next generation of Teachers of the Deaf.

You can help
Let us know if you know about cuts in your area. Email us at campaigns@ndcs.org.uk.

Find out more
To see what we know about education services for deaf children in your area please visit our online interactive map.
Interested in the research and data mentioned above? Check out the data page on our website.

Daniel’s Vlog – My Meeting with Nick Gibb

Hi, my name is Daniel and I’m a campaigner. I recently went to the Houses of Parliament in London to meet with the Minister for Schools Standards at the Department for Education, Nick Gibb MP. I asked to meet him because there still isn’t a GCSE in British Sign Language (BSL). This is really unfair to all children who use BSL as their first language. Have a look at my vlog to learn all about my day and my chat with Nick Gibb!

(This video is in BSL with subtitles)

 

 

https://e-activist.com/page/21204/action/1

My experience of Labour party conference…

Erin 1

Erin McKay

Hello, I am Erin and I’m from Wiltshire. I have a hearing loss and wear two hearing aids. I am currently doing A Level History, Philosophy and English Literature. I attended the Labour Party Conference and I’d like to tell you a bit about my experience.

On Sunday 24 September I got on the train to Brighton. It took a little under four hours to get there. I was on my way to the Labour Party conference where I had 8 meetings lined up to talk about three campaigns that the NDCS are doing. They are Listen Up to improve children’s audiology services, Right to Sign, putting British Sign Language (BSL) in schools as a GCSE and PIP’d Off, about Personal Independence Payments, and the difficulties that deaf people have in getting them. I talked about the Right to Sign campaign as it was the one I helped create with the last Youth Advisory Board.

On the Monday, Brighton was quite rainy and we arrived at the hotel at around 10am to get ready for our first meeting, it was with Sharon Hodgson, the MP for Sunderland West. She is the Shadow Minister for Public Health. She was really nice and we talked about Listen Up, Right to Sign and PIP.

Erin and Sharon

While we were talking with her, the next MP arrived – Alex Cunningham of Stockton. He was also really nice. He gave us some ideas of what to do with the campaigns and who to talk to about different bits. He agreed to ask his local hospital to sign up to the inspections for Listen Up!

Our next meeting was with Liz Twist who is the new MP for Blaydon. We talked about Listen Up! and Right to Sign. Afterwards we met Stephanie Peacock who is also a new MP, for Barnsley. She agreed to ask her local hospital to be part of the inspection process and we also talked about Right to Sign and having Teachers of the Deaf in Schools. We then had a break for lunch and walked around the exhibitions.

After lunch, we saw Jeremy Corbyn and John McDonnell. I managed to get my picture taken with both of them. Our next meeting was with Dawn Butler, the MP who signed a question in parliament. We talked to her about Right to Sign, and she seemed surprised to see that I couldn’t sign. She had already done most of what we wanted to ask her to do, and she was happy to talk about other things to help our campaigns. Next was Helen Goodman who had done a lot of work already with the National Deaf Children’s Society and she was very happy to help us. We talked about Right to Sign, Listen Up and PIP.

Erin labour

Our last meeting was with Tracy Brabin, who was friends with Jo Cox, who I wrote a bit about loneliness for. We also talked about Listen Up and Right to Sign. I had a really good time and would like to do it again.

The best bit of my day was seeing the taxi drivers showing their support for the Uber ban in London by beeping their horns. It went on for about 20 minutes and was really loud! I also liked meeting all the different MPs. Top tips from me for conference are: to share – talk to the MPs and ask questions if you don’t understand something; they are ordinary people.

Growing up in a mainstream school

Emily primary

Emily Meacher (aged 4 years) Policy and Campaigns Support Assistant

Jake’s recent blog got me thinking about my own personal experience at primary school, and how I wasn’t alone in these experiences. And so below are some random reflections of my time at Codicote primary school.

 

I was the only deaf kid in school- children used to say to me ‘why are you death?’ and I would have to try and explain at 6 years old how I am deaf and not actually dead.

I used the deaf card (I started young!) to get out of recorder sessions- I couldn’t bear the noise (can anyone?) and felt elated when I was let off.

Children were curious about how my radio aid worked, so the teacher had the bright idea of sending me out into the playground where everyone watched me. The teacher would say something into the aid but I didn’t understand a word. I felt a bit miffed about being sent out whilst the whole class gawped through the window.

I used to take part in school plays, and didn’t hear or understand any of the songs- I would just move my mouth and pretend to go along with it.

I used to go to my friends’ sleepovers and whilst a lot of the kids were up late chatting in the dark, I would be asleep. I would wake up and see the kids playing with my hearing aids, trying to put them into their ears out of curiosity.

I had a best friend Claire, who I am still best friends with to this day whose mother, told Claire she was worried about her hanging out with me- as her voice had started to get ‘lazy’- and that she was starting to sound like me! Of course, Claire didn’t listen thankfully.

Although there were times when I struggled, overall I received good educational support in school and if it wasn’t for the support there, I don’t think I’d have passed the entrance exam (this has now changed -they no longer have an entrance exam) to get into Mary Hare, secondary school. It was at Mary Hare that I developed my deaf identity.

Since my time working at the National Deaf Children’s Society, it pains me to think that some deaf children out there do not get the same support I had growing up. Some deaf children are coping, rather than thriving. This needs to change – we are working hard to challenge proposals to close resource bases and reduce support – one example being in Manchester. Hazel, our Regional Director for the North West and Sally, our Policy and Campaigns Officer fought hard alongside passionate parents, and in the end we managed to reduce the amount of budget cut to the service. Not only that, but we also managed to save one of the two resource bases under threat. Great news!

If you want to get involved in campaigns like this, then join with me and the Policy and Campaigns team by signing up to our Campaigns Network here: http://www.ndcs.org.uk/help_us/campaigns/campaign_with_us/campaign_network.html