Molly needs your vote!

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Hi I am Molly, I was born in Wales and live in Carmathen and I am profoundly deaf and use British Sign Language. I am standing for election to the Welsh Youth Parliament because I feel passionately about showing that deaf young people can do anything with the right support in Wales. I know what it is like for deaf young people living in Wales and I want to stand up and be a voice for young people and improve deaf awareness across the Country. In the future I want to work in Parliament, help my dreams come true and vote for me!

Within my current school, I have been involved in the school council for the past two years. For the past year I have been the chair of the student council. Since 2016, I have been involved in various youth councils/groups. I am a member of the National Deaf Children’s Society’s Young People’s Advisory Board. I love to support and help others like me.

As a deaf young person in Wales, travel can be really difficult. This means it can be hard to meet other deaf young people. This can make deaf young people feel alone or stressed as they cannot make many friends. I want to change this and campaign about creating more local deaf clubs in Wales.

I want to change the views people can have of deaf people, showing them that they can do any job, or activity they want to do. Deaf young people can do anything.

Also, I would use technology to connect with you to find out your views and thoughts of how to make Wales even better for us! I would do this through e-mails and using social media and make sure they are passed onto the Parliamentary group.

I am really passionate about standing up for change. As an experienced chairperson for other youth councils I have a very positive and determined attitude to help you make changes across your Country.

To read more from my manifesto, click here: https://www.youthparliament.wales/candidate-profiles/060-15-e

Please support me by voting for me in the Welsh Youth Parliament. To vote you must register by Friday 16th November 2018. It will take you two minutes to register and help change Wales for the better.

To register, click here! https://www.youthparliament.wales/candidate-profiles/060-15-e

Accessible live music: are venues doing enough for deaf children and young people?

Earlier this week I started my new role at the National Deaf Children’s Society as a Policy and Campaigns Officer. In particular, I’ll be working on all things digital, using social media, e-newsletters and more to engage individuals in campaigns concerning deaf children and young people.

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Liam O’Dell, Policy and Campaigns Officer – Digital, National Deaf Children’s Society

Such a techy job is quite exciting for someone who loves finding out about the latest gadgets and sharing their thoughts on social media – especially about music.

A few times now I’ve been lucky enough to venture down to Glastonbury (both in the scorching sun and the mud), and it’s always been an incredible experience – not least because of its access provisions for deaf people like me.

In one of the many main tents dotted around the site is Deaf Zone. Pop in there and you’ll find out about free sign language lessons for attendees (the sign for ‘Glastonbury’ is the peace sign with both hands, shaking the two fingers from left to right).

What was also impressive was the number of signed and interpreted performances – and these weren’t just reserved for the main Pyramid stage. Events on smaller stages and non-music events were also interpreted to ensure deaf people were able to access as much of the festival as possible.

Recently, sign language interpreters at gigs and concerts have gone viral online – and rightly so – for their creative versions of popular songs (most notably by rap star Eminem). Yet, while some deaf people have had positive experiences, others haven’t been able to access the support they need.

I’ve had my fair share of loud, noisy and inaccessible gigs. A performance by the band Years and Years a few years ago was affected by poor sound levels which drowned out the singer’s voice. I could feel the bass from the stage, but I still felt that sense of isolation which happens when a situation isn’t accessible.

It’s why I’ve often found myself drawn towards the smaller, intimate concert venues – where you’re not too far away from the artist to lipread them or from the stage to hear the show. Swap this for arena shows and festivals, and the more likely I am to feel a little bit confused by it all, with only the big screens to help me understand what’s going on.

Musical events – both big and small – need to be accessible, but there’s also the need for information on booking and venue websites about what services organisations provide for deaf and disabled people. It’s right that this is being recognised with Attitude Is Everything’s Outstanding Attitude Awards, which celebrates those who work towards making live events accessible.

After all, there’s a lot which goes into ‘the perfect gig’, and it’s not just the artist or band which you are going to see. Venue staff who are deaf aware also add to the experience, as does a straightforward and clear ticketing process.

While only organisations can nominate in the Outstanding Attitude Awards, the 10 categories are a great way of opening up a discussion about accessible music. What experiences have you had when it comes to live concerts and festivals? Were they accessible, and which would you nominate?

Jovita’s vlog — Taking Stolen Futures to Parliament

Jovita, one of our Youth Advisory Board members, went to Parliament on 4th July together with the NDCS Roadshow Bus as part of our Stolen Futures event. Take a look at her signed vlog below (this vlog includes subtitles).

The aim of the event was to talk to MPs about budget cuts to services for deaf children and young people. We also wanted to speak to Minister Nadhim Zahawi MP and convince him to have a meeting with us to discuss these spending cuts.

Thanks to Jovita and our other supporters on the day we have now been successful! Nadhim Zahawi has agreed to meet with us to discuss education services for deaf children — well done to all our campaigners! We will keep you updated about the outcome of the meeting.

 

Right to Sign – update on BSL GCSE campaign

Ian Noon, Head of Policy and Research, National Deaf Children’s Society

There’s been another breakthrough in the Right to Sign campaign, and it’s all thanks to two of our amazing campaigners.

Back in June, we explained that the Department for Education in England had done a U-turn and would now allow a GCSE in British Sign Language (BSL). However, they also said that there could not be any new GCSEs in this Parliament. In theory, this meant that there could be no BSL GCSE before 2022.

Daniel Jillings, a 12 year old deaf young person, decided to take legal action, with support from his Mum, Ann Jillings. His solicitors, Irwin Mitchell, argued that a blanket policy of no new GCSEs was discriminatory, especially to young people like him for whom any new GCSE in BSL would come too late if it couldn’t be introduced before 2022.

In response, the Department has conceded that it will make an exception for a BSL GCSE and that it can now be introduced before 2022. This is great news, and we would like to pay tribute to Daniel and Ann for sticking to their guns and challenging the Department on this.

In terms of what happens next, any exam body, such as Signature, will still need to meet the requirements set by the Department for Education and the exams regulator Ofqual. It’s important that any GCSE is of the highest standard and has the same credibility as other GCSEs. We’re calling on the Department to do everything it can to support and expedite progress, so that a new GCSE is ready to go as soon as possible so that young people like Daniel can benefit from it. We want to see evidence they’re taking a ‘can-do’ attitude towards making a BSL GCSE a reality.

Much will now depend on the progress that the Department, Ofqual and exam bodies like Signature make and it’s still too early to say how any new BSL GCSE will work in practice. However, the Department’s announcement is a big step forward and we can now be more optimistic that change will come sooner rather than later.

More information about Signature’s work in this area can be found on their website. Keep an eye on our campaigns blog as well for more updates.

The trouble with frameworks

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Martin McLean, Education and Training Policy Advisor (Post-14), National Deaf Children’s Society

Last week the BSL interpreter’s union, NUBSLI, released a hard-hitting report criticising the Government use of national frameworks for public services buying in BSL interpreting support.

What is meant by a framework? (One of these terms loved by policy-makers but which probably means little to most ordinary people). In this situation, it is basically a set of conditions or rules that have to be followed by public bodies when buying in services. Governments like them because it allows them to control costs and quality.

So what is the problem? NUBSLI claims that the national frameworks for interpreting services being used by the NHS, courts, police and social services are damaging because it leads to contracts being awarded to a limited number of agencies. The agencies will gain contracts on the basis of delivering the required ‘quality’ for the lowest price. NUBSLI reports that there are a number of problems with this, including:

  • Having services provided by one large agency reduces choice for deaf people. They may not be able to use their preferred interpreter and cannot change the agency provided.

 

  • There is a downwards pressure on interpreter fees and their terms and conditions which threatens to make their work unsustainable.

 

  • Inexperienced interpreters are being used for very critical situations such as court cases or child protection meetings.

In 2016 the Government introduced a Quality Assurance Framework (QAF) for support funded through Disabled Student Allowances for students from England. It was not mentioned within NUBSLI’s report but there are some similarities. The QAF requires providers of support to pay to sign up to a register and agree to a number of terms and conditions. BSL interpreters have raised concerns about the QAF too because the administrative requirements of the framework discourage freelancers from registering.

We like quality assurance but our concern is that the way this system is set up can reduce choice for students. When I took my Masters degree in 2013 I was able to provide a list of preferred interpreters to my university’s Disability Advisor. This could no longer happen under the QAF. The fear is that more experienced interpreters (and other types of support workers) who will have a strong client base will decline to work in higher education due to unfavourable terms and conditions.

Are we therefore campaigning on this issue? Whilst some reservations have been expressed with civil servants, we have not been vocal about the QAF. This is because we lack evidence from deaf students themselves that they are receiving poor quality support. It is crucial for us to have evidence of a problem if we are going to be taken seriously by the Government.

If you are a higher education student not happy with the support you are getting through Disabled Student Allowances, please let us know by contacting our helpline. The same goes for anyone receiving support through the frameworks mentioned in NUBSLI’s report. Don’t suffer in silence – your case studies are really valuable for our work!

Right to Sign — What happens next?

Ian Noon, Head of Policy and Research, National Deaf Children’s Society

The Department for Education in England recently confirmed that it does not object in principle to the introduction of a GCSE in British Sign Language (BSL). The Department also said that it was open to considering proposals for this GCSE for introduction in the longer term. We think this is a positive step forward. Previously, the Government had refused to consider any new GCSEs.

However, it’s important to note that the process for delivering a GCSE in BSL will not be short or easy.

Any exam body, such as Signature, will need to meet the requirements set by the Department for Education and the exams regulator Ofqual. In addition, the Department for Education has also said that any new GCSE could not be introduced in this Parliament so that schools can have a period of ‘stability’. Assuming there is no early election, this means there can be no new GCSE before 2022.

We are frustrated by the delay and that the Department continue to prioritise ‘stability’ over the need to ensure fairness for deaf young people. At the same time, we want any GCSE to be of the highest standard and we recognise it will take time for it to be ready. It’s important that any new GCSE in BSL has the same credibility as other GCSEs.

We’re calling on the Department to do everything it can to support and expedite progress, so that a new GCSE is ready to go as soon as the next Parliament begins. We want to see evidence they’re taking a ‘can-do’ attitude towards making a BSL GCSE a reality.

We’ve already had lots of questions about how the BSL GCSE will work. Unfortunately, it’s still too early to say how it will work in practice and much will depend on the progress that the Department, Ofqual and exam bodies like Signature make. Watch this space! More information about Signature’s work in this area can be found on their website.

There’s still a long way to go but we could not have got to where we are now without all the hard work by our campaigners and supporters – thank you to all those who’ve supported our Right to Sign campaign. We’ll be keeping a close eye on progress and will keep you updated.

Daniel’s Vlog – My Meeting with Nick Gibb

Hi, my name is Daniel and I’m a campaigner. I recently went to the Houses of Parliament in London to meet with the Minister for Schools Standards at the Department for Education, Nick Gibb MP. I asked to meet him because there still isn’t a GCSE in British Sign Language (BSL). This is really unfair to all children who use BSL as their first language. Have a look at my vlog to learn all about my day and my chat with Nick Gibb!

(This video is in BSL with subtitles)

 

 

https://e-activist.com/page/21204/action/1