Changing Technology: How we help you keep pace

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Kim Hagen, Technology Research Officer, National Deaf Children’s Society

I recently came across an old survey we ran in 1984. One of its main conclusions was that parents felt they had limited access to easily understood information about technology. Using technology can be quite daunting at the best of times, and it’s especially hard to see its benefits if you don’t have all the relevant information!

We’ve worked hard in the past decades to ensure families have the information they need to make an informed choice on the right technology to support their child. We cover technology in our events for families and parents of deaf children. Our Roadshow bus delivers technology sessions to schools around the UK. We sent out 1,866 copies of our ‘How Technology Can Help’ and ‘How Radio Aids Can Help’ booklets last year. We continue to campaign for better provision of technology to deaf children and young people; last year, we published research on the benefits of using radio aids in the early years at home. And let’s not forget our Blue Peter Technology Loan Service that went live in the mid-1980s. The name has since changed to the Technology Test Drive, but the principle is still the same: a free-of-charge technology loan service offering deaf children and young people, their families and the professionals working with them the opportunity to borrow products and try them out in their own environment.

We have close to 100 different kinds of products on our Technology Test Drive. Technology is constantly evolving and children want to be seen with the latest tech. That’s why we continuously update our stock. And we recently launched the Borrow to Buy scheme in which our members can borrow all the latest Phonak Roger radio aids, soundfield systems and accessories. But remember: despite the changes in technology the fundamental principles of how technology can benefit deaf children don’t change that much. A few examples:

• Amplified headphones can help young children listen to videos on an iPad and develop their vocabulary.
• Alarm clocks with a vibrating pad can help young children learn to tell the time and older children to get up on their own and be more independent.
• Radio aids can help your child make the most out of education and fulfil their true potential.
• Streamers can be a great way for deaf young people to make phone calls on their own, taking control of their lives and embracing responsibilities.
• Direct input leads can be used to listen to music. They look similar to the in-ear headphones a teenager’s peers may have, making them fit in and helping to develop their social identity.

The summer holidays are nearly here. Many of us might even have a break from our everyday hectic lives. Why not take this time as an opportunity to try out technology with your child? Access our Technology Test Drive, put in a request, and… happy testing!

“Involving deaf young people in the technology they use is the best way to make sure it meets their needs for the future”

Lucy Read

Lucy Read, Head of Children and Young People Participation

Technology has come a long way over the past couple of decades. Those of you who can remember dial-up networks, floppy discs and MSN will be well aware of how much technology has changed over time.

If you have absolutely no idea what I’m wittering on about ­– that is proof of just how quickly technology moves on. What was current one minute and everyone was using can quickly change and adapt with people’s changing needs.

But how often do deaf young people get to share their needs, wants and wishes for the technology they use or might want? Our experience is not very often.

We are hoping to change this by launching an exciting new Design Your Own Tech competition for young people aged 12–18; giving deaf young people across the UK the chance to showcase their tech talents.

We created the competition to raise awareness of the daily challenges the UK’s 50,000 deaf youngsters face, and of how technology can help them to overcome these.

Budding deaf designers aged 12–18 have until 13 October to submit their innovative ideas for the tech of the future.

Two lucky winners will get to present their ideas to product manufacturers and those with the power to make their designs a reality. They will also get a prize for their school, and can choose from an iPad, VR headset or Amazon vouchers.

For more information and to enter the competition, go to www.buzz.org.uk.

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Getting it right from the start

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Today, we’re launching a new campaign in England, called Right from the Start.

NDCS - Ian Noon, Head of Policy and Research

Ian Noon, Head of Policy and Research

The campaign is celebrating 10 years of newborn hearing screening and how this simple and painless test has literally transformed the lives of thousands of deaf babies.

But whilst screening has made a big difference, there is still much that needs to be done. Once diagnosed as deaf, children and their families need high quality support to ensure they can develop the language and communication skills that are the foundations for success in later life.

Unfortunately, it’s clear that this support is not being provided consistently across the country. We know there’s a massive attainment gap in the early years foundation stage, where children are assessed among a range of early learning goals. We also regularly hear from parents that vital support, such as audiologists, Teachers of the Deaf, support with communication and so on is not being provided when it can have the most impact.

We’re calling on the Government, local authorities and health bodies to work together and make a commitment to ensure high quality support is in place as soon as a child is diagnosed as deaf. Our campaign report explains how the benefits of hearing screening at birth are being lost and what action is needed to ensure deaf children get the right support, right from the start.

Join us in getting it right from the start. We’re asking our campaigners to email our report to their MP and to ask them to take action.

There’s lot of other ways you can support the campaign. Find out more at www.ndcs.org.uk/rightfromthestart.