General election 2017: Meeting the social care needs of deaf children

Christopher Kang-Mullen – Social Care Policy Adviser

The social care needs of the elderly has been getting a lot of attention during the election – but it’s important to remember the social care needs of disabled children too.

 

Social care covers a wide range of services which councils provide to support and protect disabled children and children in need to live at home and enable them to develop socially, intellectually and emotionally. This can include important services such as family centres, holiday clubs residential respite placements, child protection services and looking after children who for different reasons are not able to live at home safely.

Many deaf children and young people need additional support for their needs to be met and, whilst many families can do this, other families may need some help to ensure this happens.

Since 2010, there have been significant cuts to council budgets from central government. In March, the All Party Parliamentary Group for Children’s year-long investigation into the state of children’s social care. Their No Good Options report found that 89% of directors of children’s social care services are now struggling to meet their statutory duties to meet disabled and vulnerable children.

Even before the cuts started, we knew that deaf children had been struggling to get social care support. This is because of the demise of specialist sensory social workers and teams. As a result, in too many areas, support is too often only being provided by social workers with no real expertise in deafness or an understanding of the short and long term risks that deafness can pose unless the right support is in place.

As budgets shrink, councils will naturally focus their resources on protecting those children who at the greatest risk of abuse and support those who are cannot remain at home. This will inevitably mean that more disabled and vulnerable children will not get the support they need early on but much later when issues have become far worse.

With limited resources, councils must protect those who are in most need. But we believe that councils must also provide a range of ‘preventative’ community and leisure activities that help disabled and vulnerable children and their families feel supported, valued and able to participate and contribute to their communities as other children and families. As the No Good Options report noted, for every one pound we spend on preventative services we spend four pounds on child protection.

The current focus on the funding of adult social care has ignited a clear debate, showing the challenges that must be addressed. We also want to see politicians and parties also address children’s social care funding, recognising what social care means in its widest sense and the need for early preventative support for deaf children and other disabled and vulnerable children. We call on all political parties to make this goal a reality.

If you agree, please ask the candidates in your area what they will do to support the social care needs of deaf and other disabled children. Take a look at our website for more information and election resources.

Residential special schools and colleges – have your say

 

Emily-Meacher-cropped

Emily Meacher, Campaigns Assistant, National Deaf Children’s Society

Are you a parent of a child in a residential special school or college – or a young person studying in one? If so, a new review has been set up and they want to hear from you. 

What’s this review about?

The Government has asked Dame Christine Lenehan to carry out a review on the experiences and outcomes of children and young people attending residential special schools and colleges. These are sometimes known as boarding schools. The review will help Dame Lenehan come up recommendations for how things might be improved.

Dame Lenehan is keen to hear from as many parents and young people as possible.

How can I take part in the call for evidence?

If you are a parent of a child or young person, the review team are particularly interested in your answers to the following questions:

  • How did you find the process of getting a residential place for your child?
  • Are you happy with where your child is residing?
  • Are you supported in keeping in touch with your child when he/she is away?
  • What outcomes would you like to see from your child attending boarding school/college?

Parents could go through these questions above with their child and discuss together their experiences. Alternatively, there are also some questions for children and young people.

  • What were/are the best things about being at boarding school/college?
  • What were/are the best things about being at boarding school/college?
  • What are the staff who look after you like?
  • What would you like to do after leaving boarding school/college?

How to respond

Each submission to this call for evidence should:

  • be no longer than 2,000 words in length
  • include a brief introduction about yourself/your child and your reason for submitting evidence
  • emailed to Leneham.Review@education.gov.uk before the 17th March.

You can send through responses in alternative formats such as audio or videos.

For more information on the call to evidence, visit the Government’s website.

 

Could you help a family struggling with their child’s deafness?

Joanne O'Donnell

Joanne O’Donnell, Everyone Together Project Officer (Parenting)

The Everyone Together project will be recruiting parent/carer volunteers to support our work. Could you spare some time to volunteer with us? Project Officer Joanne O’Donnell explains more:

“The Everyone Together project supports families with a deaf child aged 0-8 years in Scotland. We are committed to building support around deaf children, beginning with the family, and bringing in professionals and the wider community.

If you remember back to when your child was diagnosed, chances are you remember that feeling of being alone. By recruiting parent volunteers, we hope that Everyone Together will provide families with emotional support from someone who has been in their position. There is nothing more encouraging than knowing someone has been through a similar situation and reached the other side.”

Interested? Read on to find out more.

What will I be asked to do?

We have a number of volunteer opportunities and we would work with you to identify the best role for you. Tasks undertaken by volunteers include:

  • Talking to parents with a newly identified deaf child. Sharing your experiences and explaining about the support we can offer;
  • Giving talks to parents and professionals at workshops, courses and conferences;
  • Speaking to the media about your family, our charity and our services;
  • Supporting a parent/carer to attend one of our events by accompanying them or meeting them at the event.

How much time will I be asked to commit?

It’s up to you – let us know what you can commit to, and we will let you know which opportunities might best suit your availability.

What support will I receive?

You will receive training and ongoing support in your role. Your achievements and contribution will be celebrated through an annual recognition event and we will reimburse all out of pocket expenses incurred through your volunteer role.

I would like to volunteer

Great! The first step is to let us know you are interested. You can do this by emailing everyone.together@ndcs.org.uk or by contacting Joanne on 0141 880 7044/ 07837 056 267. We will provide you with more information and an application form.

If you live elsewhere in the UK and would like to know about other volunteering opportunities at National Deaf Children’s Society, please email volunteer@ndcs.org.uk or call 0121 234 9829. Alternatively, you can find current volunteering opportunities on our website.

Make 2017 the year you become an NDCS volunteer.

A Day in the Life of a Parenting Facilitator

 

Anne Frances Mason

Anne-Frances Mason, Raising a Deaf Child Facilitator

Think parenting courses are all naughty steps and no fun? Think again, as Anne-Frances, one of our fabulous facilitators explains…

Many of you will have heard of ‘Raising a Deaf Child’, the parenting course designed and endorsed by National Deaf Children’s Society. For those of you who haven’t, allow me to provide you with a sneaky snapshot of the course.

My background in social work means I have experience of delivering a range of parenting classes over the years. But sorry, I have come to the conclusion that this practice of running participants through programmes from A-Z often leaves people with more questions than answers.

My current role as a Raising a Deaf Child facilitator could not be more different and here’s why:

The shape changes. The sessions might be in workshop form, a one-off weekend, regular blocks of short, sharp sessions or a taster slotted into a special event.

The sequence changes. We might begin at the end and skip backwards. Why? Because parents prioritise the topics and ‘Everyone Together’ listens.

At the heart of my job as facilitator is my duty and privilege to remind every parent and carer of a deaf child that they are the expert when it comes to their child. Parents sometimes forget this. But please don’t forget that we are all different and it is vital that we celebrate the world of differences for each deaf child.

Finally, it is only fair to make mention of the secret ingredients that have made the Raising a Deaf Child a success. Apart from the food, the fun, the ice-breakers and the guest speakers, there is that parent sitting opposite who has experienced almost exactly the same as the parent who is climbing the walls. They’ve been there, they know, and their insight is passed on. Peer power in action.

But don’t just take it from me, come and see for yourself!

The ‘Everyone Together’ project is funded by Big Lottery Fund, and supports families with a deaf child aged 0-8 years in Scotland. To find out more about our 2017 workshops, visit the Everyone Together events page.

Getting it right from the start

ndcs_right_start

Today, we’re launching a new campaign in England, called Right from the Start.

NDCS - Ian Noon, Head of Policy and Research

Ian Noon, Head of Policy and Research

The campaign is celebrating 10 years of newborn hearing screening and how this simple and painless test has literally transformed the lives of thousands of deaf babies.

But whilst screening has made a big difference, there is still much that needs to be done. Once diagnosed as deaf, children and their families need high quality support to ensure they can develop the language and communication skills that are the foundations for success in later life.

Unfortunately, it’s clear that this support is not being provided consistently across the country. We know there’s a massive attainment gap in the early years foundation stage, where children are assessed among a range of early learning goals. We also regularly hear from parents that vital support, such as audiologists, Teachers of the Deaf, support with communication and so on is not being provided when it can have the most impact.

We’re calling on the Government, local authorities and health bodies to work together and make a commitment to ensure high quality support is in place as soon as a child is diagnosed as deaf. Our campaign report explains how the benefits of hearing screening at birth are being lost and what action is needed to ensure deaf children get the right support, right from the start.

Join us in getting it right from the start. We’re asking our campaigners to email our report to their MP and to ask them to take action.

There’s lot of other ways you can support the campaign. Find out more at www.ndcs.org.uk/rightfromthestart.