General election 2017- Scotland

Lois-Drake-2-cropped

Lois Drake, Policy and Campaigns Officer, National Deaf Children’s Society

On 18 April 2017, the Prime Minister, Theresa May announced a snap election would take place on 8 June 2017. What will your new MPs in Scotland do to ensure deaf children and young people and their families in your area get the support they need?

There has been positive progress lately in Scotland for deaf young people and their families. The British Sign Language (Scotland) Act 2015 (BSL Act) was passed which marked an historic moment for deaf people across the country.

The implementation of the new laws is now underway with the draft BSL National Plan open for consultation. However work must continue by closing any existing gaps in support that exist for all deaf children and young people and their families.

Some key facts prospective MPs in Scotland should be aware of:-

  • We estimate there are as many as 3850 deaf children in Scotland today and we believe that, with the right support, they can do anything other children can do;
  • Deafness is not a learning disability, but deaf learners consistently do worse than their hearing peers at school;
  • Teachers of the Deaf are vital for many deaf children but there is regional variation in staffing levels and services are being squeezed with half are due to retire within the next 10 to 15 years;
  • The latest Scottish Government data shows that last year 11.8% of deaf learners left school with no qualifications (compared with 2.6% of all pupils) and 38.7% obtained Highers or Advanced Highers (compared with 59.3% of all pupils). This gap in achievement at school goes on to affect deaf young people’s life chances, with 24.7% going onto university compared with 41.3% of those with no additional support needs;
  • The British Sign Language (Scotland) Act 2015, Getting It Right for Every Child (GIRFEC) and a strong focus on educational attainment all have the potential to drive positive outcomes for deaf children and their families;
  • While this progress should be celebrated, there is still much work to be done to ensure that every deaf child in Scotland gets the support they need from birth – with standards of support variable across Scotland, we need MPs who will champion deaf children in their area!
  • The early years are a critical time for deaf children to develop the language and communication skills they need for life, as outlined in our recent report Getting It Right From the Start;

Will your MP be an advocate for deaf children in your area?

Tell them to email us at campaigns.scotland@ndcs.org.uk to request a briefing.

General election 2017: Uninspected audiology services

Beccy Forrow Policy and Campaigns Officer

Beccy Forrow, Policy and Campaigns Adviser

Would you send your child to a school that hadn’t been inspected by Ofsted? Would you ride in a car that didn’t conform to industry safety standards? Would you eat in a restaurant that refused to take part in food hygiene inspections? All questions I’d answer no to.

But this is what is being allowed to happen with children’s audiology services in England. Only 15% of services have been inspected and achieved a high enough standard to become ‘accredited’. This leaves the majority of services uninspected – with deaf children, young people and their families having no idea whether they are attending a great service or one that is poor quality and unsafe.

Considering that an NHS report in 2014 found that one third of audiology services were failing to meet critical NHS quality standards, with no incentive to improve, it’s unlikely that many will now be providing a better service. This matters because hearing is critical to a child’s development of language and learning. Early diagnosis and support reduces the risk of delays in language, educational, social and emotional development. But this support needs to be consistently of good quality.

Earlier this year we created an audiology map so that parents could check if their local service had reached a high enough standard to be accredited. However, of 134 services, 40 have so far refused to take part in the inspection scheme at all. Many others have registered for the scheme but not moved closer to an inspection visit over the course of the last few years.

We’re calling on the next Government to make it compulsory for all children’s audiology services in England to take part in the inspections so that parents can be confident that they are fit for purpose. As the inspections cost money and can be time consuming to prepare for, it’s vital that the Government levels the playing field by making the inspections mandatory for all services. Audiology services for deaf children won’t get better on their own.

If any general election candidates come to your door, be sure to ask them about the quality of children’s audiology services. We’ve got some other questions you might like to ask them on our election web page.

Right to Sign Campaign

Sophia-James-cropped

Sophia James, Senior Participation Officer (Campaigns) National Deaf Children’s Society

After a lively debate at a residential event in 2015, a group of 16 deaf young people voted to campaign about British Sign Language. Now, 18 months later, following our charity’s largest ever consultation of young people, their campaign for a British Sign Language (BSL) GCSE and Scottish National 4/5 in schools has finally launched.

Our board are campaigning for the Right to Sign and we want you to give your support to this campaign. To explain what the campaign is about, Beth and Aliko have filmed this video.

There are lots of reasons to get behind this campaign and Frankie, from the YAB, explains in her vlog why she thinks it’s a good idea for young people to have access to learning sign language.

Here’s how you can get involved:

Read our report

Sign our petition

There is also a different action for each country in the UK, which you can find here.

So thanks for your support and let’s make the #righttosign a reality in schools.

General Election 2017

Jacob Oakes

Jake Oakes, Policy and Campaigns Assistant

Hello fellow campaigners,

On the day of Theresa May’s
announcement that there was going to be
a snap general election in June, some of us may have felt like…

giphy (2)

Others may have felt like Brenda…

Brenda not another one

Nevertheless, this is a fantastic opportunity to help break through the election debate and bring deaf children and young people to the forefront of politics.

We here at the National Deaf Children’s Society encourage each of you (if you’re 18 or over!) to firstly register to vote, the deadline for this is the 22 May.  Secondly, please read our election resources, and challenge your local parliamentary candidates on what they will do to ensure that services for deaf children and young people are protected. Go along to any hustings being set up in your area or, if they come knocking at your door, make sure you ask them to show their support for deaf children.

Over the next five weeks, we will hear many different policy proposals from all of the parties. From Brexit to the economy to bank holidays, etc. However here, we’ll be encouraging our candidates to put deaf children and young people first. Therefore we have created ten asks for each of the parties that we want all candidates to support.

  1. Ensure that funding for services for deaf children is sufficient
  2. Inspect the quality of education services for deaf children
  3. Set up a new bursary scheme to recruit Teachers of the Deaf
  4. Establish a new British Sign Language GCSE
  5. Improve data collection so that we know how many deaf children there are and what outcomes they achieve
  6. Ensure deaf young people can access specialist careers advice
  7. Revamp the Access to Work employment support scheme
  8. Make it easier for deaf young people to become apprentices
  9. Ensure children’s audiology services are fit for purpose by making it a requirement they accredit under the Improving Quality in Physiological Services (IQIPS) programme
  10. Rule out any cuts or narrowing of eligibility criteria to welfare support for disabled children and young people.

We’ll be exploring these ten asks in more detail over the next month or so here on the campaigns blog – so keep an eye out from our policy experts.

For the time being, get registered to vote (it only takes five minutes), read up on our election resources and get challenging your local parliamentary candidates.

Have a great week!

Jake

“We must all do whatever we can”

Sally Etchells, Policy and Campaigns Officer, National Deaf Children’s Society

I recently interviewed Caroline and Anthony, members of our campaigns network and also parents to three children, Emily, Jack and Thomas. Thomas is ten months old and profoundly deaf. He also has a very rare condition called CHARGE syndrome which means he has additional needs. I spoke to Caroline and Anthony about why being a part of the campaigns network is important to them. 

 Why did you join the campaigns network? “We need to defend the services that are so vital to Thomas, our family and other deaf children. Thomas cannot tell people himself how much he needs, enjoys or how much he gets from the service so it is up to us to be his voice and to make sure that it is heard”. 

 What have you recently campaigned on? “We found out that Manchester City Council was planning to cut the Sensory Support Service for deaf children so, given how much we rely on this service, we knew we couldn’t stand by and let them do this without a fight.”

 Update: With the help of many parents and local campaigners, we managed to reduce the planned cuts in Manchester. We will now be working closely with the local authority to ensure deaf children in Manchester continue to get the right support.

 What kind of campaigning tactics did you use? “We responded to the council’s consultation and also wrote a letter to the council outlining how our whole family relies on the service. We also wrote to our local MP about the cuts and asked him to reject them on our behalf. He wrote to the council and supported us. Having your local MP on board really does make a difference.”

 What do you get from NDCS? “It is great that we can contact NDCS directly for advice or to answer any questions we have. They have travelled over to Manchester to meet with us and to gather feedback on how the changes affect us”.  

 Why should other people sign up to the network? “It is up to parents to stand up and fight for their children. We cannot allow our deaf children to be disadvantaged either now or in the future as cuts will affect children perpetually. We must all do whatever we can.” 

 Our campaigns network is made up of around 7,000 people who are passionate about campaigning to protect valuable services for deaf children and young people. The network is open to anyone and is completely free to join. Our campaigns network members take action on local and national levels to make sure services for deaf children are defended. Join the campaigns network today to be the first to find out about campaign actions in your area and to receive regular updates from the team:

http://e-activist.com/ea-action/action?ea.client.id=19&ea.campaign.id=45735&ea.tracking.id=TA

 

 

How to…stop a hearing impairment unit closing

Beccy Forrow Policy and Campaigns Officer

Beccy Forrow, Policy and Campaigns Officer

What would you do if the hearing impairment unit your child attends was in danger of closing? I’m guessing most parents would do something very similar to Wokingham parent Faye Gilbert….

Faye contacted us back in June about the HIU, based at Emmbrook Infant School, closing. Faye’s son Rhys goes to the unit and was really thriving at the school.

Although the council were allowing all the children currently in the unit to stay until they moved on to Junior school, Faye thought it was important that deaf children in the future also have the opportunity to study in an HIU, if that’s what’s best for them.

So, how was the unit saved? Faye did a number of things to persuade the council to change their minds. Most of them aren’t new or difficult but they did need time and persistence to make the difference. But happily anyone can get involved in a campaign like this…

  1. Tell people about the problem and get others that are affected on board – one of the first things Faye did was start a petition on change.org. She got nearly 2,000 supporters to sign the petition – which certainly got the attention of the council and the local media.
  1. Make sure the people who make the decision know about your campaign – the best way to do this is to speak to the media because bad media coverage is rarely ignored by councils. We can help with getting coverage and preparing for an interview but journalists almost always want to speak to someone affected by the changes.pester power
  1. Don’t stop! – decision-makers might assume that you don’t have the stamina to keep going when it looks like the odds are against you, but we all know that pester power works! Email the council and encourage as many people as you can to do the same. It doesn’t take many emails from local people for a council to starting doubting whether they are doing the right thing. Local councillors are elected by local people every four years so they will be nervous about upsetting people by making a bad decision. If you don’t get the response you want, keep writing until you do.

Although we supported Faye to win her campaign we can only ever do so much. We always need families of deaf children on board with any campaign and usually decision-makers give more weight to the views of deaf children and their families. There are a few things we can help local campaigners with:

  • emailing local parents to tell them about the issue to amplify your voice
  • joining campaigners at council meetings and help you to prepare for meetings
  • working out when key decisions will be made and who can influence the decision
  • writing letters to the council about their legal responsibilities to deaf children
  • helping you to get media coverage and to prepare for an interview
  • finding evidence about the progress made by deaf children in the local area to add weight to you arguments.

But…we can only do this if parents and those working with deaf children tell us about problems or concerns as early as possible. You can email campaigns@ndcs.org.uk or call our helpline on 0808 800 8880 – with any information that you think is worrying.

NDCS does Disability History Month – Part 1

Brian

Brian Gale, Director of Policy and Campaigns

It’s UK Disability History Month so I thought I’d take the opportunity to outline key events in the history of the National Deaf Children’s Society. Over the past 75 years, tremendous progress has been made in attitudes towards deafness. However, in writing this blog I couldn’t help but think there is still a remarkable similarity between the issues faced by deaf children of the 20th Century and today.

On the 15th December 1944 a group of parents of deaf children met in London because they were concerned over the impact of the Education Act 1944 on their children’s education. They formed the Society of St John of Beverley (who became the patron saint of the “deaf and dumb” in the eleventh century)  whose aim was to “to further provision of full modern education for all deaf children in England as originally accorded to hearing children”.   After a short while it changed its name to the Deaf Children’s Society (DCS).

From these small beginnings developed the National Deaf Children’s Society, serving the UK as well as supporting deaf children in Asia, Africa and South America.  Below I have highlighted some key events in our history between 1944 and 1964.

1944

David Jackson identified as deaf at the age of 6 months. David said his mother tried to cure it by placing brown paper soaked in vinegar on his ears and serving him a diet of fish and carrots. David said “people would try anything in those days”.

1945

DCS establishes a Teacher of the Deaf training bursary scheme and starts a campaign for the training of as many teachers as possible.

1946

DCS proposes that public health services should conduct hearing tests on children at an early age to ensure early identification and support. This campaign was finally won in 2006 when new born hearing screening was fully rolled out across the UK.

DCS publishes its first information leaflet for parents “If your child is deaf” and sets up courses for parents

1947

DCS lobbies the Department for Education to ensure teachers receive a salary while training to be Teachers of the Deaf.

child-and-teacher

1948

DCS links with groups in Glasgow and the Midlands  and then one in the NW of England. Over the next 10 years more and more parent groups are established throughout the UK and establish links with the DCS.

DCS produces a circular on research suggesting a link between German measles in pregnant women and deafness in babies.

1949

The Minster for Education agrees to fund the training of Teachers of the Deaf. The Society’s first campaign win!

At this time around 450 deaf children in London were out of school and in need of a school place.

1950

DCS takes up the case of a young deaf girl who spent years in a mental health institution before she was found to be deaf and not “disturbed”. DCS challenged the way the Ministry of Health identified children with a “mental deficiency”. 

1951

DCS suggests the shortage of school places for deaf children could be alleviated by attaching a class for deaf children to a grammar school. The Friends School in Saffron Walden agreed to be a pilot making the concept of hearing impairment units (specialist classrooms for deaf children attached to mainstream schools) a reality.

Two children learning to use hearing aid equipment

1953

The DCS commences evening courses for parents lasting 6 weeks on topics including supporting deaf children to read and develop speech and language.

The first quarterly newsletter for parents was produced. It continues over 50 years later in the form of NDCS’s Families Magazine.

DCS make access to technical training a priority as a step to work. A pilot is established with Regent Street Polytechnic for 4 deaf students.

DCS presses the Ministry of Labour to give disability resettlement officers and youth employment officers full information on the employment of deaf young people.

1954

DCS offers holiday weeks for families in caravans which were very popular.

DCS is concerned about the absence of books for deaf children. It offered £50 to authors to write books and guaranteed the publisher £500 to ensure publication.

1955

Ann William’s daughter was diagnosed as being deaf. Ann said she was told by the consultant that her daughter would never amount to anything and would need to be sent away to a special school which Ann refused to do. She was not given any information on any communication method apart from speech so the family had no choice.

First debate on the Education of Deaf Children in the House of Commons opened by Michael Stewart, Labour MP for Fulham. 

1956

The quarterly newsletter transformed into a magazine for members called “Talk”. 12,000 copies are distributed to families.

The society offers £25 grants to parents to help them pay for their children’s hearing aids.

Deaf Children's Society Talk magazine

1958

Parent groups from all over the country meet and form the National Deaf Children’s Society (NDCS). They challenge the rigid approach to teaching methods for deaf children and reject the prevailing notion that a child who doesn’t speak is a failure: “A deaf child with no means of communication at all reflects a lack of flexibility of our education provision. Any method of teaching deaf children must ensure that each deaf child is given a means of communication” 

1959

NDCS establishes the Commonwealth Society to look into the welfare of deaf children outside the UK. Its first task was to raise funds.

1960

NDCS establishes the Deaf Children’s League of Service, proving volunteering opportunities for deaf children, encouraging them to be self-reliant and help others such as old people.

1963

NDCS responds to equipment requests and loans 38 Auditory Training Units to teachers to help children use their residual hearing. NDCS hoped the loans would convince local authorities to provide the equipment.

NDCS also provides 8 buses for use by local parent groups for deaf children’s excursions. By 1967 there were 17 buses on long term loan. It included one for the Manchester University Survey Team which was conducting research into the social adjustment of deaf teenagers.

250,000 copies of ‘What do you know about deafness’ were circulated as part of a deaf awareness campaign featured in newspapers, radio and TV.

NDCS bus

1964

NDCS’s campaign against the use of the term “deaf and dumb” meets with a measure of success when the Ministry of Health stops using the term “dumb”.

The Queen and Queen mother attend NDCS’s 20th birthday party (a reception at the Mansion House) joined by members of all 29 regional parent groups across the UK.

What happens next?

For what happened next read my blog on 1964 to 1984 to be published next week.