Wales – Ask the Minister to make the right decision this summer!

Debbie Green, Policy & Campaigns Officer Wales

Debbie Thomas, Policy and Campaigns Officer Wales

The Minister for Lifelong Learning is making a big decision this summer – we need your help to persuade him to make

For example, the proposed law would allow families to appeal to tribunal if they were unhappy with a plan… but only for the parts provided by their school or local authority.

If support happens to be paid for by health, even if it is educational support like speech and language therapy, families would have complain to the NHS instead.

Another point is that health bodies would be able to withdraw educational support– even if it is written in a support plan.

Along with other third sector organisations, the National Deaf Children’s Society Cymru has lobbied for the proposed law to toughen up on health boards.

Assembly Members tasked with scrutinising the proposed new law agree with us and have recommended that the draft law be changed so that any support within a learner’s plan is backed up by a family’s right to take a case to tribunal.

Having to use two different complaints systems seems confusing. We want a single robust, consistent and accessible system.

But the Minister has said he is still sitting on the fence. He has stated that he will use the summer to come to a decision about whether or not to make this change to the draft law.

There’s just a couple of weeks to go before the Minister is due to make a decision, please help us urge the Minister to address this important issue before it’s too late.

Our online action means that you can do this in just a few clicks. It only takes a minute so please take action now!

What is the new law?

The Welsh Government’s Additional Learning Needs and Education Tribunal (Wales) Bill is currently working its way through the political passages at the Welsh Assembly. If it successfully passes and becomes law, it will change the way in which support for learners with additional needs is planned for.

The new law would affect deaf children, young people and their families all over Wales.

You can find out more information and access our Q&A on the proposed new law here.

Don’t underestimate the power of taking part in an e-action!

I’m guilty myself of looking at e-actions and wondering whether one more signature or one email from me will really make a difference. But it really does.

The National Deaf Children’s Society has a history of achieving good results through e-actions. Just last year, supporters in Wales took part in an e-action to send a template response to a Welsh Government consultation. As a result, our supporters made up a fabulous 28% of the total responses and the Government report that followed had a specific section outlining our concerns about how its proposals would affect deaf children.

We need your help again to shout out about this very important issue. It only takes a few clicks, so please take action now and then spread the word to your family and friends – the more people who take part the better!

Thank you.

“The support I had growing up… and why we shouldn’t take it for granted”

Jacob Oakes

Jake Oakes, Policy and Campaigns Assistant

We all know that feeling of nervous excitement before our first day at school, a new place or a new job. Over these last few months, I’ve reflected a great deal on my first day at Tilbury Primary School, a total communications unit in a mainstream school in Hull.

My parents often tell me that they noticed an instant overnight change in my confidence and ability to communicate. The ethos of the resource base, ‘that deaf children can achieve anything with the right support’ was key in mine and my deaf class mates’ development.

What I gained from attending Tilbury as a deaf child, was a place where I learned that I was not alone in my deafness, a place where I was encouraged to expand my communication skills. Now I can comfortably place one foot in both the hearing and the deaf world.

Additionally, at Tilbury I received extra support in subjects that I was struggling in. I received speech and language therapy. I was taught how to care for my hearing aids and I also learned about my own identity as a deaf person.

Shortly after arriving at National Deaf Children’s Society, I closely followed colleagues  challenge damaging proposals to close the resource bases in Hull. The base, which Tilbury merged into a few years ago, was under threat of closure.  This meant that future generations of deaf children in Hull,  would not have the same specialist educational support that I had.

It was a real eye-opening moment in which I realised that the support that I received when growing up, the support that enabled me to be the person I am today is not guaranteed for every deaf child. Specialist educational support for deaf children whether that be a resource base, Teachers of the Deaf or technological support cannot be taken for granted.

Due to the incredible work of Alison, Sally, parents and campaigners in Hull, the resource bases at Christopher Pickering and Sirius West will remain open for deaf children and young people in Hull. A fantastic result!

If you want to get involved in campaigns like this and join me with the Policy and Campaigns team at NDCS! Sign up to our Campaigns Network here:

http://www.ndcs.org.uk/help_us/campaigns/campaign_with_us/campaign_network.html

General election 2017- Scotland

Lois-Drake-2-cropped

Lois Drake, Policy and Campaigns Officer, National Deaf Children’s Society

On 18 April 2017, the Prime Minister, Theresa May announced a snap election would take place on 8 June 2017. What will your new MPs in Scotland do to ensure deaf children and young people and their families in your area get the support they need?

There has been positive progress lately in Scotland for deaf young people and their families. The British Sign Language (Scotland) Act 2015 (BSL Act) was passed which marked an historic moment for deaf people across the country.

The implementation of the new laws is now underway with the draft BSL National Plan open for consultation. However work must continue by closing any existing gaps in support that exist for all deaf children and young people and their families.

Some key facts prospective MPs in Scotland should be aware of:-

  • We estimate there are as many as 3850 deaf children in Scotland today and we believe that, with the right support, they can do anything other children can do;
  • Deafness is not a learning disability, but deaf learners consistently do worse than their hearing peers at school;
  • Teachers of the Deaf are vital for many deaf children but there is regional variation in staffing levels and services are being squeezed with half are due to retire within the next 10 to 15 years;
  • The latest Scottish Government data shows that last year 11.8% of deaf learners left school with no qualifications (compared with 2.6% of all pupils) and 38.7% obtained Highers or Advanced Highers (compared with 59.3% of all pupils). This gap in achievement at school goes on to affect deaf young people’s life chances, with 24.7% going onto university compared with 41.3% of those with no additional support needs;
  • The British Sign Language (Scotland) Act 2015, Getting It Right for Every Child (GIRFEC) and a strong focus on educational attainment all have the potential to drive positive outcomes for deaf children and their families;
  • While this progress should be celebrated, there is still much work to be done to ensure that every deaf child in Scotland gets the support they need from birth – with standards of support variable across Scotland, we need MPs who will champion deaf children in their area!
  • The early years are a critical time for deaf children to develop the language and communication skills they need for life, as outlined in our recent report Getting It Right From the Start;

Will your MP be an advocate for deaf children in your area?

Tell them to email us at campaigns.scotland@ndcs.org.uk to request a briefing.

General election 2017: Uninspected audiology services

Beccy Forrow Policy and Campaigns Officer

Beccy Forrow, Policy and Campaigns Adviser

Would you send your child to a school that hadn’t been inspected by Ofsted? Would you ride in a car that didn’t conform to industry safety standards? Would you eat in a restaurant that refused to take part in food hygiene inspections? All questions I’d answer no to.

But this is what is being allowed to happen with children’s audiology services in England. Only 15% of services have been inspected and achieved a high enough standard to become ‘accredited’. This leaves the majority of services uninspected – with deaf children, young people and their families having no idea whether they are attending a great service or one that is poor quality and unsafe.

Considering that an NHS report in 2014 found that one third of audiology services were failing to meet critical NHS quality standards, with no incentive to improve, it’s unlikely that many will now be providing a better service. This matters because hearing is critical to a child’s development of language and learning. Early diagnosis and support reduces the risk of delays in language, educational, social and emotional development. But this support needs to be consistently of good quality.

Earlier this year we created an audiology map so that parents could check if their local service had reached a high enough standard to be accredited. However, of 134 services, 40 have so far refused to take part in the inspection scheme at all. Many others have registered for the scheme but not moved closer to an inspection visit over the course of the last few years.

We’re calling on the next Government to make it compulsory for all children’s audiology services in England to take part in the inspections so that parents can be confident that they are fit for purpose. As the inspections cost money and can be time consuming to prepare for, it’s vital that the Government levels the playing field by making the inspections mandatory for all services. Audiology services for deaf children won’t get better on their own.

If any general election candidates come to your door, be sure to ask them about the quality of children’s audiology services. We’ve got some other questions you might like to ask them on our election web page.

Right to Sign Campaign

Sophia-James-cropped

Sophia James, Senior Participation Officer (Campaigns) National Deaf Children’s Society

After a lively debate at a residential event in 2015, a group of 16 deaf young people voted to campaign about British Sign Language. Now, 18 months later, following our charity’s largest ever consultation of young people, their campaign for a British Sign Language (BSL) GCSE and Scottish National 4/5 in schools has finally launched.

Our board are campaigning for the Right to Sign and we want you to give your support to this campaign. To explain what the campaign is about, Beth and Aliko have filmed this video.

There are lots of reasons to get behind this campaign and Frankie, from the YAB, explains in her vlog why she thinks it’s a good idea for young people to have access to learning sign language.

Here’s how you can get involved:

Read our report

Sign our petition

There is also a different action for each country in the UK, which you can find here.

So thanks for your support and let’s make the #righttosign a reality in schools.

General Election 2017

Jacob Oakes

Jake Oakes, Policy and Campaigns Assistant

Hello fellow campaigners,

On the day of Theresa May’s
announcement that there was going to be
a snap general election in June, some of us may have felt like…

giphy (2)

Others may have felt like Brenda…

Brenda not another one

Nevertheless, this is a fantastic opportunity to help break through the election debate and bring deaf children and young people to the forefront of politics.

We here at the National Deaf Children’s Society encourage each of you (if you’re 18 or over!) to firstly register to vote, the deadline for this is the 22 May.  Secondly, please read our election resources, and challenge your local parliamentary candidates on what they will do to ensure that services for deaf children and young people are protected. Go along to any hustings being set up in your area or, if they come knocking at your door, make sure you ask them to show their support for deaf children.

Over the next five weeks, we will hear many different policy proposals from all of the parties. From Brexit to the economy to bank holidays, etc. However here, we’ll be encouraging our candidates to put deaf children and young people first. Therefore we have created ten asks for each of the parties that we want all candidates to support.

  1. Ensure that funding for services for deaf children is sufficient
  2. Inspect the quality of education services for deaf children
  3. Set up a new bursary scheme to recruit Teachers of the Deaf
  4. Establish a new British Sign Language GCSE
  5. Improve data collection so that we know how many deaf children there are and what outcomes they achieve
  6. Ensure deaf young people can access specialist careers advice
  7. Revamp the Access to Work employment support scheme
  8. Make it easier for deaf young people to become apprentices
  9. Ensure children’s audiology services are fit for purpose by making it a requirement they accredit under the Improving Quality in Physiological Services (IQIPS) programme
  10. Rule out any cuts or narrowing of eligibility criteria to welfare support for disabled children and young people.

We’ll be exploring these ten asks in more detail over the next month or so here on the campaigns blog – so keep an eye out from our policy experts.

For the time being, get registered to vote (it only takes five minutes), read up on our election resources and get challenging your local parliamentary candidates.

Have a great week!

Jake

“We must all do whatever we can”

Sally Etchells, Policy and Campaigns Officer, National Deaf Children’s Society

I recently interviewed Caroline and Anthony, members of our campaigns network and also parents to three children, Emily, Jack and Thomas. Thomas is ten months old and profoundly deaf. He also has a very rare condition called CHARGE syndrome which means he has additional needs. I spoke to Caroline and Anthony about why being a part of the campaigns network is important to them. 

 Why did you join the campaigns network? “We need to defend the services that are so vital to Thomas, our family and other deaf children. Thomas cannot tell people himself how much he needs, enjoys or how much he gets from the service so it is up to us to be his voice and to make sure that it is heard”. 

 What have you recently campaigned on? “We found out that Manchester City Council was planning to cut the Sensory Support Service for deaf children so, given how much we rely on this service, we knew we couldn’t stand by and let them do this without a fight.”

 Update: With the help of many parents and local campaigners, we managed to reduce the planned cuts in Manchester. We will now be working closely with the local authority to ensure deaf children in Manchester continue to get the right support.

 What kind of campaigning tactics did you use? “We responded to the council’s consultation and also wrote a letter to the council outlining how our whole family relies on the service. We also wrote to our local MP about the cuts and asked him to reject them on our behalf. He wrote to the council and supported us. Having your local MP on board really does make a difference.”

 What do you get from NDCS? “It is great that we can contact NDCS directly for advice or to answer any questions we have. They have travelled over to Manchester to meet with us and to gather feedback on how the changes affect us”.  

 Why should other people sign up to the network? “It is up to parents to stand up and fight for their children. We cannot allow our deaf children to be disadvantaged either now or in the future as cuts will affect children perpetually. We must all do whatever we can.” 

 Our campaigns network is made up of around 7,000 people who are passionate about campaigning to protect valuable services for deaf children and young people. The network is open to anyone and is completely free to join. Our campaigns network members take action on local and national levels to make sure services for deaf children are defended. Join the campaigns network today to be the first to find out about campaign actions in your area and to receive regular updates from the team:

http://e-activist.com/ea-action/action?ea.client.id=19&ea.campaign.id=45735&ea.tracking.id=TA