My experience of Labour party conference…

Erin 1

Erin McKay

Hello, I am Erin and I’m from Wiltshire. I have a hearing loss and wear two hearing aids. I am currently doing A Level History, Philosophy and English Literature. I attended the Labour Party Conference and I’d like to tell you a bit about my experience.

On Sunday 24 September I got on the train to Brighton. It took a little under four hours to get there. I was on my way to the Labour Party conference where I had 8 meetings lined up to talk about three campaigns that the NDCS are doing. They are Listen Up to improve children’s audiology services, Right to Sign, putting British Sign Language (BSL) in schools as a GCSE and PIP’d Off, about Personal Independence Payments, and the difficulties that deaf people have in getting them. I talked about the Right to Sign campaign as it was the one I helped create with the last Youth Advisory Board.

On the Monday, Brighton was quite rainy and we arrived at the hotel at around 10am to get ready for our first meeting, it was with Sharon Hodgson, the MP for Sunderland West. She is the Shadow Minister for Public Health. She was really nice and we talked about Listen Up, Right to Sign and PIP.

Erin and Sharon

While we were talking with her, the next MP arrived – Alex Cunningham of Stockton. He was also really nice. He gave us some ideas of what to do with the campaigns and who to talk to about different bits. He agreed to ask his local hospital to sign up to the inspections for Listen Up!

Our next meeting was with Liz Twist who is the new MP for Blaydon. We talked about Listen Up! and Right to Sign. Afterwards we met Stephanie Peacock who is also a new MP, for Barnsley. She agreed to ask her local hospital to be part of the inspection process and we also talked about Right to Sign and having Teachers of the Deaf in Schools. We then had a break for lunch and walked around the exhibitions.

After lunch, we saw Jeremy Corbyn and John McDonnell. I managed to get my picture taken with both of them. Our next meeting was with Dawn Butler, the MP who signed a question in parliament. We talked to her about Right to Sign, and she seemed surprised to see that I couldn’t sign. She had already done most of what we wanted to ask her to do, and she was happy to talk about other things to help our campaigns. Next was Helen Goodman who had done a lot of work already with the National Deaf Children’s Society and she was very happy to help us. We talked about Right to Sign, Listen Up and PIP.

Erin labour

Our last meeting was with Tracy Brabin, who was friends with Jo Cox, who I wrote a bit about loneliness for. We also talked about Listen Up and Right to Sign. I had a really good time and would like to do it again.

The best bit of my day was seeing the taxi drivers showing their support for the Uber ban in London by beeping their horns. It went on for about 20 minutes and was really loud! I also liked meeting all the different MPs. Top tips from me for conference are: to share – talk to the MPs and ask questions if you don’t understand something; they are ordinary people.

5 Ways A Radio Aid Can Help A Deaf Toddler

Alison Taylor, Senior Information Editor, National Deaf Children’s Society

Compelling evidence shows (see the research) that giving deaf children radio aids in the critical early years, before they start school, can be hugely beneficial for developing their language and supporting communication. But in which everyday situations can they help? Here’s our top five.

1. Family time at home
Whether it’s playing a game together, reading a story before bedtime or talking to your child when they’re in the garden or another room, a radio aid can help deaf children hear their parent’s voice clearly and directly, making them feel connected to their parents and helping build strong relationships.

2. Communicating in the car
When you’re driving you can’t turn to your child to sign, or for them to lip-read you, so being able to communicate effectively is vital when parents are travelling with their child. Radio aids can cut through the background noise of the car engine and the road, allowing you to soothe them if they’re having a tantrum, talk about where you’re going in the car and even play games to make the journey more fun!

3. At nursery or pre-school
Early years settings can be fantastic places for children to get a head start in developing their language and communication before they start school, but they can also be noisy places. Nursery staff can use a radio aid to get a deaf child’s attention to make sure they’re taking part in activities fully and mixing with other children, as well as starting to learn.

4. Staying safe when out and about
You’re at the park and your child is about to walk into the path of a swing, or worse – they let go of your hand and are headed straight for a road – how do you stop them when they can’t hear you calling after them? A radio aid means that your child can hear you at a distance and it will cut through the background noise so you can alert them to danger.

Helen and Alex tell us how a radio aid keeps their three-year-old daughter, Gwen, safe when crossing the road and riding her bike.

5. Actually, whenever they can’t see you
As a parent of a deaf child, you’ll often need to stop what you’re doing and face your child to get their attention and to talk to them, whether you’re out shopping, your child is in a pushchair or in a seat on the back of your bike – whenever they can’t see you. Being deaf aware and creating good conditions for listening are still important, but a radio aid can be a great help for busy parents in those everyday noisy situations that you just can’t control.

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Think radio aids might be right for your child?

Find out more about radio aids and how to get one by downloading our booklet for families How Radio Aids Can Help.

Try out a radio aid for free through our Technology Test Drive service.

Read our Quality Standards for the Use of Personal Radio Aids which sets out a common approach to providing radio aids for deaf children.

Watch our video of a group of mums who tell us how they use a radio aid when out and about with their child.

 

General election 2017: Uninspected audiology services

Beccy Forrow Policy and Campaigns Officer

Beccy Forrow, Policy and Campaigns Adviser

Would you send your child to a school that hadn’t been inspected by Ofsted? Would you ride in a car that didn’t conform to industry safety standards? Would you eat in a restaurant that refused to take part in food hygiene inspections? All questions I’d answer no to.

But this is what is being allowed to happen with children’s audiology services in England. Only 15% of services have been inspected and achieved a high enough standard to become ‘accredited’. This leaves the majority of services uninspected – with deaf children, young people and their families having no idea whether they are attending a great service or one that is poor quality and unsafe.

Considering that an NHS report in 2014 found that one third of audiology services were failing to meet critical NHS quality standards, with no incentive to improve, it’s unlikely that many will now be providing a better service. This matters because hearing is critical to a child’s development of language and learning. Early diagnosis and support reduces the risk of delays in language, educational, social and emotional development. But this support needs to be consistently of good quality.

Earlier this year we created an audiology map so that parents could check if their local service had reached a high enough standard to be accredited. However, of 134 services, 40 have so far refused to take part in the inspection scheme at all. Many others have registered for the scheme but not moved closer to an inspection visit over the course of the last few years.

We’re calling on the next Government to make it compulsory for all children’s audiology services in England to take part in the inspections so that parents can be confident that they are fit for purpose. As the inspections cost money and can be time consuming to prepare for, it’s vital that the Government levels the playing field by making the inspections mandatory for all services. Audiology services for deaf children won’t get better on their own.

If any general election candidates come to your door, be sure to ask them about the quality of children’s audiology services. We’ve got some other questions you might like to ask them on our election web page.

Campaigning: working with professionals in Wales

Debbie Green, Policy & Campaigns Officer Wales

Debbie Thomas, Policy and Campaigns Officer, Wales, National Deaf Children’s Society

Whenever you meet new people, the inevitable conversation starter almost always crops up; “what do you do for a living?” I always take great pride in replying that I work as a campaigner for NDCS Cymru, but there are a lot of misconceptions about what being a campaigner involves.

At a friend’s hen party this weekend, I was asked: “So what does your job involve when you are not cheering and holding a placard?” Well, actually my job hardly involves placards at all!

While placards and demonstrations can be important and effective in some cases, my work is really about positively engaging and working collaboratively with policy makers and professionals. Those working to make new laws or to deliver services for deaf children ultimately want to see new laws and changes to services which are effective and work well. The bulk of my work is about looking at proposed changes and then meeting and working with key decision makers to suggest how these changes could be tweaked to ensure they work for deaf children, young people and their families. I like to think I work with officials rather than against them, pulling out placards and petitions only when raising concerns has not been sufficient and greater action is required.

It is quite fitting that after being asked the placard question, I spent the day with health professionals at a children’s audiology unit. I was part of an audit panel reviewing how the service was meeting standards set by the Welsh Government.

These standards first came into place in 2010 and cover a range of points from waiting times, qualifications and training of audiologists, and ensuring that families receive key information. Every year, audiology sites across Wales are asked to score how well they believe they are meeting each standard and to provide evidence for it. A panel made up of audiology practitioners from other services in Wales and an NDCS representative then review the evidence against the scores given.

For me, this is a great example of how, as a campaigner, you work with and alongside professionals as a critical friend. We support good practice, suggest areas for improvement in the interests of our members, and raise our hands when we feel something is going wrong. Essentially, we have a common aim: to ensure our services for deaf children and their families are up to standard.

Getting it right from the start

ndcs_right_start

Today, we’re launching a new campaign in England, called Right from the Start.

NDCS - Ian Noon, Head of Policy and Research

Ian Noon, Head of Policy and Research

The campaign is celebrating 10 years of newborn hearing screening and how this simple and painless test has literally transformed the lives of thousands of deaf babies.

But whilst screening has made a big difference, there is still much that needs to be done. Once diagnosed as deaf, children and their families need high quality support to ensure they can develop the language and communication skills that are the foundations for success in later life.

Unfortunately, it’s clear that this support is not being provided consistently across the country. We know there’s a massive attainment gap in the early years foundation stage, where children are assessed among a range of early learning goals. We also regularly hear from parents that vital support, such as audiologists, Teachers of the Deaf, support with communication and so on is not being provided when it can have the most impact.

We’re calling on the Government, local authorities and health bodies to work together and make a commitment to ensure high quality support is in place as soon as a child is diagnosed as deaf. Our campaign report explains how the benefits of hearing screening at birth are being lost and what action is needed to ensure deaf children get the right support, right from the start.

Join us in getting it right from the start. We’re asking our campaigners to email our report to their MP and to ask them to take action.

There’s lot of other ways you can support the campaign. Find out more at www.ndcs.org.uk/rightfromthestart.

Have your say on audiology services in Leeds!

Arthur Thomas Campaigns Officer

Arthur Thomas Policy & Campaigns Officer

NDCS are supporting a review of Leeds Audiology Services. If you live in the Leeds then make sure your voice is heard by taking part in a short survey below.

By completing the survey you can help Leeds Audiology Service understand how best to meet the needs of deaf children across Leeds.

Please follow the link below to contribute to the review and have your say:

Complete-the-survey-button-red

We will keep you updated about the progress of the review.

If you have any questions or would like any more information, please contact Carla Rose-Hardman at: Carla.Rose-Hardman@ndcs.org.uk

Liam’s Story: Volunteering with the NDCS Youth Advisory Board

Youth Advisory Board (YAB) volunteer

Liam, Youth Advisory Board (YAB) volunteer

It’s been over a year now since I first joined NDCS’ Youth Advisory Board (YAB) as a volunteer. The role of the YAB is to work closely with the NDCS and help them with their campaigns and projects. After finding out through NDCS’ online website for young people, The Buzz, I decided to apply…

The reason I chose to join the YAB was because I have always liked to voice my opinion on issues that matter to me. My deafness is one of the main things I am passionate about, and being able to share my thoughts and opinions with other like-minded, deaf young people from across the UK seemed like a great opportunity to get involved in.

As well as that, I’m a huge fan of networking and meeting new people. I’ve been to three YAB meetings since March 2014 and I’ve met some great deaf role models, made new contacts and friends for life in my fellow YAB members.

Lastly, I always wanted to learn British Sign Language. Where I live, there isn’t much opportunity to learn, but one year on, I’m proud to say that I am learning more BSL every day. Over one year on from joining the YAB, all of us have achieved some great things.

In terms of campaigns, one YAB member, Zanna, recently took legal action against the Government for not consulting deaf young people about the proposed changes to the Disabled Students’ Allowance, and forced them to delay their plans to cut back support for disabled students (read more about this story here)! Other members of the YAB went to numerous party conferences to meet MPs and ask key questions concerning deaf young people. In particular, the Board contacted the Department for Education to tell them our thoughts on teaching assistants (TAs). We have also contacted the NHS and health commissioners about local audiology services. Overall, the YAB’s campaigning work has been quite impressive!

But that’s not all. We’ve helped the NDCS with designing leaflets about the Local Offer, vision statements, as well as sharing our thoughts on resources that the NDCS creates.

As it’s Volunteers’ Week, now is the perfect time to recommend getting involved in voluntary opportunities like the Youth Advisory Board. Opportunities like these are so important because there’s endless benefits to both you and the organisation you are helping. By seizing opportunities like these, you have the chance to make personal achievements (make new friends, develop new skills and so on), as well as make a key difference to an organisation through giving up your time, sharing your thoughts and helping them with their work.

For deaf young people, I cannot recommend the Youth Advisory Board enough, and for everyone, I thoroughly recommend exploring every voluntary opportunity there is available to you – the possibilities and benefits are endless!