DSAs are important for deaf people – now I know why

Liam (radioshow photo)

Liam O’Dell former YAB member

I heard about Disabled Students’ Allowances (DSA) a while ago. My deaf friends would turn to me and talk about all the changes that are happening to DSAs and Personal Independence Payments (PIP). It sounds bad, but for a long time I thought I couldn’t get DSAs, so the changes didn’t bother or affect me. It was only when I spoke to an advisor at my university that I realised how important they are to deaf people across the UK.

For a long time, I didn’t bother applying for DSAs because I thought the support available was just note-takers, interpreters and lip-speakers, which I personally don’t use. It was through that appointment with my university’s Disability service that I realised DSAs can cover more than that – and I was annoyed I hadn’t applied sooner!

After sorting out evidence for my application, an appointment with my DSA assessor was arranged. Although I had no previous experience talking to an assessor, I knew a bit about what it would involve through my work with the NDCS’ Youth Advisory Board (YAB). During my time on the YAB, I remember a lot of people saying how strict they can be with their assessments – but that definitely was not the case for me.

If anything, I think a DSA assessor is more like a lawyer who will fight your corner, but who will also be honest if they think something isn’t going to work. In the end, it was decided that I could benefit from having a palantypist (or ‘speech-to-text reporter), a dictaphone recorder, and someone to help me when listening to audio recordings.

Since then, all my support has been arranged and it’s amazing how much DSAs is helping me. Without this support, I would have had concerns. But, now that I have the allowance in place, this is not an issue. Now I know how DSAs can put the minds of deaf students at rest.

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