Make it the law to close the gap

Katie Rafferty, Policy and Campaigns Officer Scotland

Katie Rafferty, Policy and Campaigns Officer Scotland

That is what the Scottish Government is aiming to do through their proposed Education (Scotland) Bill. The Bill contains fresh proposals that would require public authorities to report on how they are succeeding to close the education gap for the most disadvantaged young people.

The Scottish Government’s vision for children and young people is to make Scotland the best place in the world to grow up and learn. The wide attainment gap that exists between those leaving school with the best and poorest outcomes undermines that vision. The Bill, along with the Government’s Attainment Challenge Fund work, aims to tackle this issue.

How do deaf children and young people stand to benefit? With the right support, deaf learners can achieve the same outcomes as their hearing peers of similar ability. Despite this, deaf learners are among the lowest attainment groups in Scotland. This has been acknowledged through the recent Inquiry into the attainment of pupils with a sensory impairment.

However, the challenge lies in how the Bill defines “disadvantaged” and its focus on socioeconomic deprivation. Of course, there is a strong connection for all young people, including those who are deaf, between poverty and poorer educational outcomes.

However, poverty is not the only factor which can affect how well a deaf young person does at school. National and local investment into the things they might need at school: qualified interpreters, specialist teachers, good acoustics and effective technology, all have an important role to play. No matter how well off a family is, if something a deaf child needs is missing in their local community they won’t be supported to reach their full potential.

NDCS welcomes this ambitious new Bill, but we are calling on the Scottish Government to take the opportunity to address the multiple factors that cause attainment gaps, including Additional Support Needs. You can read our response to the committee here.

You can find out more about the Bill and follow its journey through Scottish Parliament here.

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