5 things we’ve recently learnt about deaf children and Teachers of the Deaf in the UK from the CRIDE report

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Kelsey McQuaid, Projects Officer

Every year the Consortium for Research into Deaf Education (CRIDE), survey local authorities to find out about education provision for deaf children across the UK. CRIDE was developed in 2010 in conjunction with NDCS, National Sensory Impairment Partnership (NatSIP), British Association of Teachers of the Deaf (BATOD), academic institutions, special schools and Heads of Services.

Here are five things we’ve learnt from the most recent report:

  1. There are at least 48,125 deaf children in the UK. This is an increase of 16% since 2011 and 7% since 2013. There could be a number of reasons for this increase, such as changes in demography, an increase in the number of deaf children or perhaps services have become better at recording information about deaf children.
  2. The number of Teachers of the Deaf has decreased from 1,488 in 2013 to 1,433 in 2014, a 3% decline. In England, the number of qualified Teachers of the Deaf has fallen below 1,000 for the first time. CRIDE is especially concerned that the number of Teachers of the Deaf is decreasing given that there is also a suggested increase in the number of deaf children.
  3. Only 9% of Teachers of the Deaf had a level 3 qualification in British Sign Language (BSL), which is usually required as the minimum for anyone working directly with deaf children who communicate in BSL.
  4. 5% of Teachers of the Deaf in resource provisions are not qualified as Teachers of the Deaf nor are in training to become one. In England, this would be regarded as unlawful – the Special Educational Needs and Disability Code of Practice states that teachers of classes of deaf children should be qualified Teachers of the Deaf.
  5. Many Teachers of the Deaf may be retiring in coming years. We found that over 530 Teachers of the Deaf are due to retire in the next 10 to15 years, amounting to 51% of qualified Teachers of the Deaf. CRIDE is concerned that there are not enough new Teachers of the Deaf to replace those about to retire.

NDCS will continue to use the data collected from CRIDE to provide an evidence base for our campaigns and to lobby politicians for change so that our vision of a world without barriers for every deaf child can be realised.

For more information about the CRIDE survey and the results, go to www.ndcs.org.uk/CRIDE

 

2 thoughts on “5 things we’ve recently learnt about deaf children and Teachers of the Deaf in the UK from the CRIDE report

  1. I don’t think enough incentive is given to people who become teachers of the deaf – it is extremely costly to move up the scales, as my wife has to become highly qualified in signing. Yet the salary increments based on your qualifications are marginal at best – teachers of the deaf should be better paid. Then you’d see more people learning.

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  2. Sorry as a ToD it has been my experience that too many can’t be bothered to learn to sign properly and think that just waving their hands about a bit occasionally qualifies. The standard of signing many deaf pupils are subjected to is no better than ‘scribble’.

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