10 things GPs in Wales should do for deaf patients

Elin

Elin Wyn, Policy and Campaigns Officer for Wales

Did you know that deaf people in Wales have certain rights when they go to see their doctor?

The NHS in Wales has published a set of Standards on Accessible Communication and Information for People with Sensory Loss. These standards tell GPs and hospitals what they should be doing to make sure deaf people hear and understand everything they need to know about their healthcare needs. This should make it easier for deaf young people to become more independent when they visit the GP. And to make life easier for you here are 10 things GPs in Wales SHOULD be doing to help deaf patients:

1)   Asking patients what communication needs they have.

2)   Setting up a flagging system to record that information on the patient’s paper or computer record.

3)   Checking that the environment encourages effective communication – e.g. checking lighting and background noise

4)   If a patient is referred from the GP to a hospital the GP should also transfer information about their communication needs.

5)   Patients should be able to make appointments in different ways e.g. by email, texting, textphones and websites.

6)   The GP reception and consulting rooms should be fitted with a hearing loop and staff should know how to check they are working.

7)   Reception staff should have arrangements in place to make sure deaf people don’t miss their appointment.

8)   Every patient who needs communication support should have it – and it’s the GP practice that should arrange this and that pays for this support.

9)   All staff should be trained in how to communicate effectively with deaf people

10)   The GP practice should promote the different forms of communication that are available to deaf patients.

These standards are a part of your rights as a deaf young person in Wales. If your GP doesn’t do these things you can complain to the Local Health Board that your GP practice is not sticking to the Standards on Accessible Communication.

For advice for deaf young people on visiting the GP independently have a look at our “My life my health” resources.

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